fitting bathroom mortice lock

Hi,
How do you fit bathroom mortice lock (like below) into the door ?
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will be fitting bathroom door and need a clue on how to make a cut
out ...
thanks for any help
Reply to
olo
Have you considered one of these:
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need for extra cutting and easy to fit.
Reply to
F
They usually come with fitting instructions including a cutting template in the pack. Use the template to mark up the door, remove most of the wood for the case of the lock by drilling a single line of large holes and then using a chisel to remove the remaining waste wood to form a rectangular opening. Chisel out the rectangular recess for the faceplate, and drill the holes for the handle and thumb turn.
DG
Reply to
Derek Geldard
Drills and chisels. Mark out the 4 corners which need to be cut out. Drill down each of these corners. A 10mm drill is good for this. Then get out a 16mm (19mm may be ok, depending on your lock width) forstner bit, and drill out as much as possible of the remaining wood between the corners. Be sure your drill goes in straight, otherwise it will come out of the side - ruining the door in many cases.There is only around a 6-8mm gap between the door edge and cut out, so be careful all the way down. Once you've drilled out all you can, get a decent chisel, and start cleaning the cut-out out, to give a nice flush fit for the lock. Once it is sliding in well, you need to cut out the opening for the outer section of the lock. This is fiddly, as the edges are within 3mm of the door edge, so easy to take a chink of the wood out.
Now it should be a good, tight, but easy to get in, fit. Take it out, and mark up the holes for the lock key and handle spindles.Drill through with a 16mm drill/forstner bit.Do one side at a time, then turn the door over, if you drill straight through, you are likely to splinter the rear door face around the hole. To get both holes in line, run a small pilot drill all the way through - 2mm will be fine if you've got a long enough bit. And thats about it for a lock. I charge £40 to fit a new mortice locked door from scratch - too cheap I think, considering the skill needed to get them right every time. Alan.
Reply to
A.Lee
To keep the drill moving in the right direction, use an auger bit rather than a forstner bit: forstner:
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you're being cheap, you can use a flat bit - but they're nowhere near as good.
Reply to
dom
That's the same as the one I used ( but in brass) along with a tubular mortice similar to this .
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the cutting out you need is for the mortice latch .Turning the thumb thingy at the bottom locks the handle .Easy peasy and for safety the lock can be released from the outside by use of a coin or screwdriver in the slot on the other side . Stuart
Reply to
Stuart B
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...or by small boys wishing to irritate the hell out of their teenage sister in the shower
David
Reply to
Lobster
olo,
To save my poor fingers in writing a description, the following link will give you some idea on how to go about it.
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answers you're original question, but unless you want security as well as privacy, there is an easier way to go about 'locking the door' - a simple 3" (75mm) brass barrel bolt screwed to the inside of it.
Brian G
Reply to
Brian G
Of course, I got my Auger and Forstner mixed up! I havent got any Forstner bits, so have only ever used one years ago in a brace and bit. Alan.
Reply to
A.Lee
The same as described here for a simple latch:
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you will need a row of holes in the edge of the door to take out most of the wood, and some time spent with a chisel squaring it up after.
Reply to
John Rumm
As your link shows - it will be easier to use an auger or flat bit of the correct size (around 20mm).
There is only a need to drill a single hole in the edge of the door for the catch -- and a single hole through the face of the door using the same bit for the handle spindle - no cleaning up with a chisel needed here then.
The only chisel cutting needed will be to cut the elongated slot for the latch 'holding' and receiver plates.
Nice link by the way - brings back a few memories looking at the 3" x 2" timbers hold the door on edge. Used these dozens of times when I was too idle to carry - or even make - the old saw horse.
Brian G
Reply to
Brian G
Indeed.
Remember the OP was asking about a bigger mortice lock though, and not a simple tube latch as shown in the piccies. Hence my comment at the bottom of the wiki article that you will need to drill several partially overlapping holes with your auger or spade bit to clear the space for the lock.
If you are using the type of lock the OP cited :
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you will need to remove a slot of timber in the door as well to accommodate it. Unless you can find a way to space the holes very close to each other with substantial overlap, I would be surprised if you could do it all without a chisel.
Yup, handy for doors as they leave it at the right working height... the other alternative I find is to clamp the end in the edge of a workmate, but its not as stable.
Reply to
John Rumm

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