Fitting a couple of extra radiators

Got the system drained down, and I'd like to take the opportunity to fit a couple of extra new radiators - one GF kitchen, and one FF bathroom (heated towel rail in fact). Access is fairly easy, and they'll be fitted 'inline' to an existing combi copper piped system. The pipe runs are fairly simple, with a short horizontal under the suspended timber floors to a right angle up to meet the radiator.
I did follow a recent thread that seemed to rest on the virtues of pipe/solder, but these are likely to be the first/last joins of this kind that I do for a while. So, I'm not sure it'll be worth investing the time/money.
Could anyone recommend a suitable method for this situation, with pointers to the best types of fittings to use?
--
Cheers, Rob

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
RJH scribbled...

Solder joints are the cheapest option and look the tidiest when finished.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 09/09/2013 01:34, Artic wrote:

Agreed. But as the joints will be out of sight, and I have neither tools or skill to solder, might there be a decent alternative?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 09 Sep 2013 09:02:53 +0100, RJH wrote:

Ahh, in that case copper tube with a proper tube cutter and push fit fittings. Make sure you remove any burrs or swarf from the tube before inserting it into a fitting.
Not being totally convinced that plastic will handle the thermal cycling on a CH circuit in the long term and for this project only a few fittings required look at compression or Cuprofit.
--
Cheers
Dave.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
RJH scribbled...

Soldering is easy. Cut off a short piece of pipe, clean it up with wire wool and test solder a cleaned up connector to one end. With plenty of flux at the right temperature, the solder will run through the joint and you'll be able to see it from the inside. Heat the joint up again and pull off the connector, clean up and try again. You'll soon pick it up. FFS if plumbers can do it, so can you.
All you need know is get the copper clean and bright and don't touch it for a few minutes after you've finished the joints.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 9 Sep 2013 01:34:19 +0100, Artic wrote:

this

investing

Under the floor so looks are probably not an issue.
I don't think there will be a lot in it cost wise between plastic and copper. Pipe might be similar in cost but plastic needs supporting every 18" or so to avoid large sags, cost of clips and screws. Plastic pipe will need a proper plastic pipe cutter, copper a small blow lamp, flux and solder both around 15 to £20?. Plastic fittings are around 5 times the cost of end fed (don't forget the inserts for plastic pipe), the saving there will easily pay for a small copper pipe cutter if the OP doesn't have a hacksaw and file...
It may well come down to the OP already having the abilty to do soldered joints reliably, there is a bit of skill required. Only the most cack handed fup up pushfit.
--
Cheers
Dave.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.