Fence post- bitumen on lower end?

Hi all.
I get a bit obsessive in trying to make sure that the end results of my DIY
jobs are long-lasting (where appropriate). On the matter of wooden fence p
osts, is it likely to increase the life of the below ground section if I co
ver that portion of the wood in bitumen? I imagine that preventing soaking
from ground water should do some good.
Thanks.
Jim.
Reply to
Jim Walsh
In message , Jim K writes
It is possible to purchase fence posts pressure treated with creosote from specialist suppliers.
The stretch of by-pass fencing through my farmland was completed in 1977 and is still sound (although not actually creosote and is fireproof with a mothball smell).
Someone was marketing plastic sleeves for protecting the area where soil bacteria/fungi are active but I've not seen any positive reports.
Reply to
Tim Lamb
+1 and I haven't found a solution.
Embedding in concrete with the top angled so that water runs away from the wood is an improvement but also a lot more work. I have also tried a lead cap on the top of big posts to stop freeze thaw splitting them.
Does it make a worthwhile difference? I might try that.
I generally find the deeply buried spike in perfect condition once it is buried more than about 6" - this makes it much harder to get out.
Reply to
Martin Brown

Is it still 'creosote' (was it ever) when wood is 'Tanalised'?
This give a description of what looks like an 'extended' process (but it might always have been like this):
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I knew it generally use a lack of pressure (rather than 'pressure') to draw the preservative into the timber but the above link takes it further to potentially leave the surface of the timber 'drier'?
Seems there are quite a few different techniques ..
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I have two 6" square gateposts and one has rotted off at ground level and the other seems to be as good as new. I've got two steel posts ready to go back in their place and the rest of the posts are concrete. ;-)
Cheers, T i m
Reply to
T i m
Even pressure treated one rot - after about 10 years - or less. Concrete spurs or "Metposts" keep the wood out of the ground.
Reply to
charles
The soil/air layer is where posts rot first
When I had wooden fence posts extending the concrete above the soil level and sloping the edges for water run off extended the life significantly.
When real creosote was readily available I used to stand the posts for a week or so in a large bucket filled with creosote and old engine oil, occasionally painting the mixture up the posts whist still soaking.
The bitumen method may work well. There is a company that does impregnated bands to be fitted around the post bridging the soil/air boundary
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Reply to
alan_m
Well, the 47 y/o power poles we had replaced because of woodpecker damage were fine at ground level. But then, they're properly treated.
I'd go for the former. The latter don't have enough grip on the posts.
Reply to
Huge
In message , Huge writes
I have an idea the utility companies may use *boron nails* as a life extender. Lots of poles end up on farms as fencing strainer posts.
Reply to
Tim Lamb
IY jobs are long-lasting (where appropriate). On the matter of wooden fence posts, is it likely to increase the life of the below ground section if I cover that portion of the wood in bitumen? I imagine that preventing soakin g from ground water should do some good.
I have a short bit of 100mm drain pipe with a blank on one end. I stand the posts in creosote (equivalent) for a day. Takes a while, I can only fit one post in at a time.
Reply to
harry
DIY jobs are long-lasting (where appropriate). On the matter of wooden fen ce posts, is it likely to increase the life of the below ground section if I cover that portion of the wood in bitumen? I imagine that preventing soak ing from ground water should do some good.
I prefer the approach where you set the post in a very weak gravel/cement ( 6/1?) mix. That way it's easier to yank it out and replace
Reply to
stuart noble
Another approach if you want the wooden post look at least on one side is to concrete in repair posts then attach your post clear of the ground to the repair post. It will also be easier to repair if sometime in the future it rots or snaps.
Richard
Reply to
Tricky Dicky
In article , Huge writes:
A fence I installed over 30 years ago using the Metposts is still fine. They were a make called Fensock which I don't think exists anymore. They clamp the timber with a pair of nuts and bolts which close the steal collar tightly around the post bottoms.
When I looked for something similar some years later, I couldn't find it. I could do with some now for a different fence if anyone knows of a source.
Reply to
Andrew Gabriel
I thought they all did that? I've helped the neighbour fit this type, the thin straps bite into the posts.

Reply to
Andy Burns
Up to your usual tricks again I see, Harry, not reading your own links! On the one you provided, they're called Metposts, without the 'A' in the middle, and there are plenty of other links calling them Metposts.
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Reply to
Chris Hogg

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