Energy efficient homes to apy less council tax?

On 04/08/2013 18:14, Dave Liquorice wrote:

A prescription is a single item on the form irrespective of the number of tablets. My charge for a prescription didn't go up when the doctor doubled the dose.
You don't need a 8 weeks supply per item - you want fewer prescriptions therefore 6 months supply per prescription. You may find however that a doctor is unwilling to prescribe more than 3 months supply in one go.
It's interesting to see the wholesale prices for the medication you may be taking. Most of my (generic) prescribed medicines comes out at less than 50p packet (£1.50 to £3 for a three month supply) but I once had some "paint" for a foot infection that was £160 for 10ml and I went through 5 bottles.
Prices found around 4 years ago when I first started taking long term prescribed drugs.
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On 04/08/2013 21:23, alan wrote:

You might want six months supply - but all too many PCTs imposed strict 28-day policies. Backed up by doctors who were willing to go along with that. When the cost of prescribing is greater than the cost of the medicine, where are the savings by doling it out on 28-day amounts rather than 854-day or longer?
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On 04/08/2013 18:14, Dave Liquorice wrote:

One item if they are on the same script.

Just ask the GP to put tabs x 84 and get 3 months. the pharmacist will either supply three x 28 or split a pack of 112.
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On 04/08/2013 18:14, Dave Liquorice wrote:

It doesn't matter about pack size. The pharmacy will supply the exact number of pills on the prescription form. With generic drugs, often different manufacturers will have different pack sizes.
Unfortunately with different manufacturers the size of the pill can vary. Some3 are easy to swallow and some are not.
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If your employer has a flexible benefits scheme, look into that. This is the sort of thing where you can sacrifice some of your salary for some benefit, e.g. to increase your employer's pension contribution, provide a company car, etc.

The big issue with most of these energy efficiency measures is that the cost of getting someone to do it for you wipes out the benefits. If you can get a large program of DIY enery efficiency measures going, there's a real potential to save energy, instead of taxing people to create jobs which don't do anything to help this country's bottom line. However, since it's largely driven by the industries which hope to make a profit from energy saving lobbying the government, this sadly seems unlikely to happen.
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On 04/08/2013 14:19, Andrew Gabriel wrote:

Sadly a company car is seen as more income when it comes to tax credits!
A company mobile phone is just about the only tax free perk I can think of?
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On Sun, 4 Aug 2013 13:19:00 +0000 (UTC), Andrew Gabriel wrote:

my

That'll be me then, self employed ...
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On 04/08/2013 17:39, Dave Liquorice wrote:

Then by forming a ltd company you can nominally set your own income and make sure you get all these benefits.
If you take the mickey HMRC might have some words, but anywhere near the threshold and you're a winner. Plus you can get further expenses such as 45p per mile for running your car and company mobile for you and your employed wife?
Self employments and benefits don't mix.
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On 04/08/2013 14:19, Andrew Gabriel wrote:
<SNIP> > The big issue with most of these energy efficiency measures is that

Any government scheme tends to work out like that. I've looked at a few schemes and one that springs to (money saving, not energy saving) was grants to retro-fit cars for LPG. I looked at it, as at the time I was doing high mileages, but it turned out that it would be around £1200 to get it done at the local, approved fitter, but I could get around £800 grant if I went to the goverment grant scheme approved fitter - who charged £2000!
Similar pricing differences seem to occur with most goverment grant schemes.

Instead you get no financial help and they require you to pay the local council to inspect and approve your improvements!

I'd say "unlikely" is being severely over-optimistic!
SteveW
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On 04/08/2013 22:48, SteveW wrote:

There were DIY subsidies a year ago but they weren't proving very effective and were abused by professionals.
Did you see how many builders were buying cheap insulation.
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On Mon, 05 Aug 2013 10:34:17 +0100, "dennis@home"

Was it being used as insulation?
If the aim is to insulate every home in the UK as much as possible then surely making it as simple and easy as possible is the thing to do.
Spoke to some blokes last year just as the free stuff was running out. They said it was hard enough convincing people to have it for free.
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Very irritating, given that it cost me £300 to upgrade ours to (better than) current standards.
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wrote:

Unbelievable with todays energy prices.
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On 05/08/2013 15:45, harryagain wrote:

There can be reasons. Many people need their loft space for storage. We do not have the current standard of insulation, as to do so would mean putting in a raised floor and the headroom is so limited, that would not be very practical.
I have however made a start on installing suspended ceilings with insulation below the existing ceiling.
SteveW
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On Monday, August 5, 2013 6:44:58 PM UTC+1, SteveW wrote:

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That's the main reason I've heard. I boarded the loft middle sections befor e it was insulated, so it can be walked on safely if need be. Also put some big shelves on the wall. Where storage on the floor is needed, I've made s ure it is insulative. For example, bags of clothes are OK - with the loft i nsulation tucked back around them. Probably get some scrap celotex to creat e rafts if any more general storage needed. Our upstairs was much warmer la st winter than the one before. Simon.
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On Mon, 05 Aug 2013 12:04:20 +0100

Not here. British Gas paid for our loft insulation, and there isn't even mains gas in the village. Great!
Funny, we have a British Gas employee living here, and also a BT Fibre installer. Neither of these services are in any way expected in the area in the foreseeable future. - Davey.
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On 06/08/2013 00:54, Davey wrote:

No they didn't - WE paid 10% extra via our gas bills for all that "free" insulation. 10% of electricity/gas bills now goes to pay for the windmills and to people who generate electricity with solar panels.
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On Tue, 06 Aug 2013 01:45:25 +0100

True. I pay a British Gas bill in another place, so I paid as well. And I hate the wind turbine and solar panel subsidy concept. If it's so great, let it support itself.
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wrote:

So why is one OK and the other not?
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Davey wrote:

Insulation does at least have the good grace to work 24x7
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