Electricity costs.

I know this is cheeky but I wondered if anyone would be willing to give me a "price comparison" for their electric usage?
My house is a large 2 bedroom bungalow. I say large because we have large rooms and a big kitchen dining room and extra big sitting room as well as two double bedrooms.
There is no gas main where I am so I use all electric - economy 7
The bill for this last year has come to £1086 . That includes the central heating last winter. The company is British Gas - so not the cheapest I am sure but given its E7 none of them come in greatly cheaper for my area (Cornwall) so I have stayed with who I know since they have been no trouble.
My eco conscious and money miser husband thinks our bill is high and wants me to look for ways to cut it. I cant find any.
He wants me to stop using my washing machine which goes on once a week - or maybe twice if I have anything big and my usual wash is 40 degrees although I occasionally use the higher wash rates for bed clothes and towels.
He wants me to use the dishwasher less - I put it on every other day at normal ( 55 degrees) wash and he wants to switch the emersion heater off altogether - it goes on for an hour each night to provide water for cleaning and washing every day. He says our bill is high ( the DD is £26 a month ) but I cant see where its going other than on things I need now.
My mum tells me her leccy bill is higher than ours yet she uses a coal fire central heating system ( but my parents are old and need the heat so do supplement it with electric fires and she has a much bigger house).
I just wondered what other people who are all electric in a comparable situation might be paying.
Sorry to be a pain.
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sweetheart wrote:

I'm also sorry to appear flippant, BUT, you problem is not the electricity but your husband. If he want you to stop using these appliances, is he going to do the resulting extra work? If he want cheaper electricity, get him to seek out a cheaper supplier. Incidentally, I have found BG have improved markedly of late, but that doesn't make them the cheapest.
As for the bill, it sounds reasonable enough - I'm guessing the DD figure is per week !
All you can do is ensure there is maximum insulation, including excluding drafts, get on the lowest available tariff and adjust your lifestyle to suit. It's not just YOUR problem, but both of yours ! Sorry to sound unsympathetic, but his attitude stinks.
Andy C
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On Sun, 15 Aug 2010 09:40:13 +0100, Andy Cap wrote:

Ditto all wot he said.
Do you manage the account wholly on-line? Most suppliers now offer a discount if you opt for a fully on-line managed account. I get an extra 10% discount on my account.
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The Wanderer

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No, to do this would be cheaper I know - about £30 cheaper but to be honest I have a phone bill on line and its a pain. I can never see what we are paying. I like to get the bill and see it. At least that way I know whats going on.
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On 15/08/2010 10:26, sweetheart wrote:

I don't understand that. You may not get a paper bill in the post - but with most suppliers you can access a bill online and print it out if you wish. That is certainly true with my BT phone bills and my Scottish Power and Southern Electric energy bills.
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Roger
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That has not been my experience with either BT or videophone ( my mobile phone). The bills are erratic. On personal level I have to remember the log in details and on at least one occasion they locked me out despite the details being correct..
When I do see the bill it isn't like having a paper copy in my had to read. I can rarely make sense of them Finally online bill management seems to mean you have no right of recourse to speak to anyone, it has to be done online.
But bottom line is, I would like a bill sent . I am old fashioned and want to sit and read it .
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Regularity seems to just the same. I used to get a paper bill as well as the online ones for BT the paper bill would come through the door within a few days of the online one being ready.

As has been said, you can always view a pdf (I always save a copy of the pdf copy locally as well) or print it out.

I wouldn't say never, there are too many options out there. But none of mine suppliers. (BG, Npower and BT) Bg is a web specific tariff, were we don't get the option of paper bills, but I can still phone someone up with a query. The others are just paperless billing options for discount. I can still ring them.

Fair enough. But you are paying for that. Don't know what tarrif you might be on, but for us with BG we would pay about £150 pa more on the standard tariff compared to the online one we have
Re the original question. FWIW, I think your consumption is reasonable. I'd guess that maybe 2/3 consumption goes on heating and HW then around 300 GBP for all the rest seems reasonable.
I think you are right in you belief that there aren't significant savings to be made given that you seem to be using stuff sensibly. Sure you might trim a little off by using washing machines/DW less - but you still ahev to washup/do washing, but there are limits. eg. I'd not consider a couple of hours of immersion heater a luxury. Boiling water every time you want HW is a faff,as is having to plan ahead for wanting a shower or bath
For a possibly not very helpful comparison We are a family of 4 - 2 kids, around a lot in the day. Gas for HW and CH. Largish 4 bed Victorian house, with probably too many computers etc and lights getting left on.
Annual consumption up to end of July was about 8200 kwh, which on our tariff (Click energy 6) was about GBP 725
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Chris French


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Its about £30 difference a year between what I have and a paperless billing tarrif with BG

Thanks.
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sweetheart wrote:

Have you had a look at 18185 as a way of reducing phone costs? Works very well for me.
http://www.18185.co.uk
Chris
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Chris J Dixon Nottingham UK
snipped-for-privacy@cdixon.me.uk
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In the last 3 years I have found BG to be cheapest BUT this is for my usage of dual fuel. Comparing other peoples bills is often like comparing apples with oranges. Unless you live in identical properties and have an identical lifestyle the bills could be substantially different.

I agree, to me the figure does appear realistic and the stated usage of appliances on a day to day basis is not out-of-order.
If the OP has registered on the Web with BG they would be able to see the historic information on the account and they would be able to calculated exactly the usage in KW for a complete 12 month period. This figure could be then plugged into the web comparison sites.
The warning I would give about BG is that they will keep you on the tariff you signed up to. They may have a cheaper tariff they haven't told you about. You still need to go to the price comparison sites to see if BG have a cheaper deal. In my experience changing tariffs with BG takes around two minutes on line on their own web site if you have registered your previous account with them. Changing tariffs will mean a minimum contract period during which there is a fee if you change suppliers or tariffs again. However this minimum period is often around 6 months, which is shorter than with some other suppliers.
--
Alan
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On Sun, 15 Aug 2010 09:20:08 +0100, sweetheart wrote:

Our monthly DD is £51... we don't space heat with electricity. I've just given them a meter reading, online, and I'm reasonably sure I saw a page flash up saying the the DD is going to rise to £61 and that I don't need to do anything. Oh yes I fing do, I need to contest that DD rise. I want to be under paying a little rather than over a lot!

You haven't managed to chuck him out yet then?

12 X 26 = £312. Bill £1086 = shortfall of £774. The power companies are normally very good at ensuring that they owe you money all the year rather than the other way round. OK we are talking Bristish Gas but I don't think even they are that incompetent. B-)
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Dave.




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On Sun, 15 Aug 2010 09:20:08 +0100, sweetheart wrote:

Our monthly DD is £51... we don't space heat with electricity. I've just given them a meter reading, online, and I'm reasonably sure I saw a page flash up saying the the DD is going to rise to £61 and that I don't need to do anything. Oh yes I fing do, I need to contest that DD rise. I want to be under paying a little rather than over a lot!
Thank you for that.

You haven't managed to chuck him out yet then?
No, I do love him despite his obsession with money. I just want to know how reasonable it is and what should be reasonable fuel ( energy costs in total ) costs for a year.

12 X 26 = £312. Bill £1086 = shortfall of £774. The power companies are normally very good at ensuring that they owe you money all the year rather than the other way round. OK we are talking Bristish Gas but I don't think even they are that incompetent. B-)
I am sorry I did make a mistake there. The DD is £26 a week. That is for everything since we dont have any other form of fuel at all. british Gas have just raided it to that for the next period. We were paying a DD of 86 a month and now its to be £108. We are currently £122 in credit on the bill we received yesterday.
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"sweetheart" <hotmail.com> wrote in message

I pay £100 per month for dual fuel, and in a bungalow, but we're retired so in all day.
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On Sun, 15 Aug 2010 10:23:35 +0100, sweetheart wrote:

All electric and total energy bill of £1300 or there abouts. Oooo I wish. £600/year for electric but add 4,000l of oil at 40p (or more per litre) so another £1600+, so thats an energy bill of around £2,200+/year. Fuel Poverty? Yep that's us...
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Dave.




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With BG you can give them your own meter reading on-line as many times as you like. A monthly reading will result in accurate bills.
A shortfall of £700 could result if they have assumed that heating is supplied by another utility company and no meter readings, either official or customer self read, have been applied to the account. However, there would be no shortfall if the OP has given the equivalent weekly DD amount rather than a more normally quoted monthly amount.
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Alan
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On 15 Aug, 09:20, "sweetheart" <hotmail.com> wrote:

Your pattern of usage seems very reasonable - you're already doing all the right things to reduce your bill.
What do you do for hot water for daily washing? Electric showers, or do you manage everything with the hot water from the cylinder?
You might look at running your immersion a good while longer than an hour on economy 7, if you're having to supplement it with hot water from elsewhere.
But *above all* what will save you money is any improvements you can get in home insulation - 250-300mm loft insulation, cavity wall insulation, draughtproof windows (which usually means modern double glazed units), hot water tank insulation, and tackling draughts - both those due to how the house is built (poor fit, cat flaps etc), and bad habits with doors left open etc.
Low energy lights might save you a bit, as might careful planning with electric cooking, only filling the kettle with what you need, turning down heating in less used areas of the house, thick curtains and carpets - it all counts - but house insulation is the big win.
Like you, there's no gas in my area, and I have oil-fired central heating and hot water - but have gone overboard on the insulation and airtightness - and reap the benefits.
Really, you sound to be doing all the right things, and your bill is probably around average for a rural all-electric house.
To get your bills down substantially, you're looking at extensive professional insulation and draughtproofing (an investment), or changing to a cheaper source of heating (oil, LPG, or even a ground source heat pump) - a large investment
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On 15 Aug, 09:20, "sweetheart" <hotmail.com> wrote:
Your pattern of usage seems very reasonable - you're already doing all the right things to reduce your bill.
What do you do for hot water for daily washing? Electric showers, or do you manage everything with the hot water from the cylinder?
Most of it is from the cylinder. We do have an electric shower but its not used so often as many may use theirs.
But *above all* what will save you money is any improvements you can get in home insulation - 250-300mm loft insulation, cavity wall insulation, draughtproof windows (which usually means modern double glazed units), hot water tank insulation, and tackling draughts - both those due to how the house is built (poor fit, cat flaps etc), and bad habits with doors left open etc.
We have all of that. The only problem I do find is living in a very damp part of the country we are constantly plagued by condensation since increasing the insulation. I have been told this is because we are totally air tight and we run the heating too low!
But we have double glazing, we have full insulation and the bloody eco bulbs.
Low energy lights might save you a bit, as might careful planning with electric cooking, only filling the kettle with what you need, turning down heating in less used areas of the house, thick curtains and carpets - it all counts - but house insulation is the big win.
I only cook properly once a week ( today) My husband has suggested I should get up extra early and run the oven on the cheap rate . The cooker is new ( as are the dishwasher and washing machine) so is A rated. In the week I do a minimum of cooking because I am out working.
I have told my husband ( he knows anyway) that we need to keep the house at a minimum temperature because I have a weak chest and get bouts of pneumonia if I get an infection and its left with me in the cold .
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You might try a dehumidifier then. Because everything (especially clothes/upholstery) will feel bone-dry to the touch, you may be comfortable with a slightly lower room temperature. (However, if your house is a sealed box, you should really have properly designed house ventilation - usually by kitchen and bathroom extracts).
Electric blankets are great things in cold houses - also keeping the sheets bone dry and comfortable, in addition to the warmth - and very cheap to run.
And buy warm clothes - really, really expensive arctic stuff - and make that skinflint hubby pay.
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You might try a dehumidifier then. Because everything (especially clothes/upholstery) will feel bone-dry to the touch, you may be comfortable with a slightly lower room temperature. (However, if your house is a sealed box, you should really have properly designed house ventilation - usually by kitchen and bathroom extracts).
Electric blankets are great things in cold houses - also keeping the sheets bone dry and comfortable, in addition to the warmth - and very cheap to run.
Best thing since the proverbial sliced loaf IMO. We hate warm bedrooms.
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We were somewhere around Barstow, on the edge of the desert, when the
saying something like:

He'd only moan about the cost of running it.
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