Electrical connection on vintage clock

Elderly relative handed me an electric clock at Xmas and said, "Can you make this work?"
Picture here:
http://i49.tinypic.com/dg6ia0.jpg
http://i50.tinypic.com/20ie1af.jpg
Those pins are approx 1cm long, 13mm apart and 3mm in diameter.
Does anyone know whether a suitable connector for those pins is still available / what it's called / where it might be bought?
If it's possible to source the right lead, is there any reason that it mightn't be safe to use? Is there anything in there that might have decayed over the years?
Thanks in advance for any info.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Pretty sure it's a standard 5A female connecter, like these
http://compare.ebay.co.uk/like/260739202198?var=lv&ltyp=AllFixedPriceItemTypes&var=sbar&adtype=pla&crdt=0
http://www.romark.co.uk/itemdisplay.asp?item=EL172.jpg
Something like that is intrinsically pretty safe, I wouldn't worry unless offering it for sale.
Incidentally there is a knack in starting those synchronous motors, without a kick-starter, you can get it to run backwards and even at double speed.
--
Graham.
%Profound_observation%
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Look at the Op's picture carefully ...
--
geoff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm not 100% sure what you are getting at, but let me explain further
Here is my clock, similar, but perhaps a later design. http://www.flickr.com/photos/g3zvt/8312918232/in/photostream/lightbox /
The "turn slowly" knob is what I'm calling the kick starter it gives the motor a kick with a spring loaded pawl and with a little luck it keeps going. It cannot be rotated backwards and it cannot impart sufficient force to make the motor run at 2X.
On the OPs clock the "roll knob" is actually the spindle of the synchronous motor itself.
--
Graham.
%Profound_observation%
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 25/12/12 19:36, mike wrote:

http://lespook.wordpress.com/synchronous-clocks/temco/#comment-3180
may help.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 25/12/2012 19:36, mike wrote:

The thing that would concern me is if it is electrically safe given the age. I might be being very pessimistic but if someone were injured or it caught fire then I would not want it on my conscience.
--
Regards Peter Crosland

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Its not hard to check that its electrically safe.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 25/12/2012 22:25, Rod Speed wrote:

Assuming that the OP has access to the test gear and knows how to use it. The fact that he asked suggests that he might not. It would be foolish not to get it tested before expending money on a new plug and cable.
--
Regards Peter Crosland

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Nope, its easy enough to do a visual inspection and fix anything that looks like it might be electrically unsafe.
Stuff of that vintage isnt normally double insulated, so all you really need to do is make sure the exposed metal is connected to the earth line in the cable if it has one or just ensure that nothing is likely to come off an make any exposed metal live if it isnt earthed.

Easy enough to inspect it visually. Its unlikely to be electrically unsafe if it looks fine and it can always be tested if you are mindlessly paranoid.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 25/12/2012 23:57, Rod Speed wrote:

You are naive to think that a visual inspection of any mains powered electrical equipment is sufficient to ensure that it is safe. This is even more crucial with vintage equipment such as the OP has.
--
Regards Peter Crosland

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Any electrical test can only indicate if the equipment/installation is safe at the moment of testing. It can break down a moment afterwards. There are mathematical formula to predict the likelyhood of this happening.
The test itself can cause breakdown.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
harry wrote:

Why not just fit a 1A fuse, then it can't do any harm.
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Other than electrocute you ;)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 26/12/12 10:56, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

hard to do since the whole thing is made of bakelite
--
Ineptocracy

(in-ep-toc’-ra-cy) – a system of government where the least capable to
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There is some exposed metalwork shown in the photos, the hands set and start knobs. Certainly an internal inspection to see any potential for these becoming live would be worth while.
There is even the possibility that one pin or the other could be connected to the body of the mechanism and with a 2 pin reversible connector that could be somewhat unsafe.
If it is ever powered up then, as with any electrical equipment of that age, some caution is needed.
Is there any chance that the OP could post some internal pictures?
--
Bill

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And a visual inspection, multimeter test can check for that too.

Just as true of electrical stuff bought new.
But modern RCDs remove most of the risk now.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not with stuff of that era where its very easy to inspect visually.

Mindlessly silly with stuff that easy to visually inspect.
And it isnt hard to do a proper test on it if you want to anyway.
And even if he doesn't know how to do that, its completely trivial to learn how to do that.
Plenty of the operations into that sort of vintage stuff will do it for free too.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 26/12/2012 08:55, Rod Speed wrote:

Please explain how a visual inspection will give conclusive evidence that the insulation properties are adequate? So far your advice has been worthless and indeed dangerous.
--
Regards Peter Crosland

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

[67 lines snipped]

Look who you're talking to! It's the idiot Rod Speed. Just killfile and forget him.
--
Today is Setting Orange, the 68th day of The Aftermath in the YOLD 3178
Don't do business with Churchill Insurance - they're slime.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 26/12/2012 13:07, Huge wrote:

I did wonder if he was still drunk from the previous day! Advice taken.
--
Regards Peter Crosland

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.