Easy way to get a bearing race out of a recess

I was struggling to get the outer bearing race out of the mower roller so decided to try a spot of weld. I ran a bead around the inside of the race and then tacked a plate on the end so I could knock it out ... but it fell out! Put here in case it helps someone.
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On Sun, 13 May 2018 17:20:28 +0100, snipped-for-privacy@aolbin.com wrote:

Another and possibly easier way is to use my internal bearing extractor with slide hammer (assuming I have one that fits the ID of the bearing etc).
But you are right about the heating effect ... I once froze a motorcycle wheel bearing whilst heating the ally wheel with a hot air gun and the bearing just dropped in! It also came out a lot easier when warming the wheel up as well.
I just re-bearinged a couple of trailer hubs and having a 10 tonne hydraulic press and a lathe to turn suitable 'pushing' tools makes that sort of job a breeze as well. ;-)
I've also got a set of external bearing pullers that again, as long as you can get them into place make such jobs very easy (as does having a welder etc).
Cheers, T i m
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On 13/05/2018 17:35, T i m wrote:

Mine didn't fit :-(

Yes, I've done that in the past. In this case I was surprised that heating (rather than cooling) the race worked so well - I presume it transferred heat to the housing and then shrank back faster than the housing.

I've often wondered about making a press with an old bottle jack but there's always been another way of solving problems so I haven't needed to do it.

Mine fall off, or the centre bolt wanders around on whatever it' pushing against. I used a Dremel slitting disc to cutter the inner races so I could crack them off the shaft.
It's down to the bearing suppliers tomorrow for the new bearings, then I can continue mowing :-(

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On 13/05/2018 18:00, snipped-for-privacy@aolbin.com wrote:

Yes, that's a great technique especially on "heat sensitive" hardware.
Going back to the "welding" approach, that will make the bearing lose its temper. Most such metallurgical transformations result in a dimensional change, I don't recall which way it goes for bearing steel ATM but sounds like they must shrink. The heat will also "cook" any sticky degraded oil residues. I've never been quite sure why a gas axe is so effective on things like exhaust pipe clamps. You don't have to melt them off, get the bolts red hot and they usually unscrew easily (even though you might expect any new oxide created to make them tighter).
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On Sun, 13 May 2018 18:00:24 +0100, snipped-for-privacy@aolbin.com wrote:
<snip> >Yes, I've done that in the past. In this case I was surprised that

Could be?

Sure, there are often many way of doing stuff but now I have one, I wouldn't be without it. ;-)

I think they normally have a centre point and the end of the shaft a hole? If they don't I turn up a little adaptor. ;-)

That's another way. ;-)

Good luck. ;-)
Cheers, T i m
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On Sun, 13 May 2018 17:20:28 +0100, nothanks wrote:

That's the thing about interference fits and heat. :-)
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says...

I remember being fascinated by the way they put the tyres onto railway wheels.
I pooh-poohed the idea at first, thinking that tyres were always made of rubber and trains don't have rubber tyres!
(I was about 12 at the time.)
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Terry

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On 14/05/18 11:12, Terry Casey wrote:

Or how they put new tyres onto wooden waggon wheels...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dQSMs-b0Jzg
31 minutes onwards
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On Mon, 14 May 2018 11:12:24 +0100, Terry Casey

About the same age I learned that some of the train is going backward when it is going forward. ;-)
Cheers, T i m
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On 13/05/2018 17:20, snipped-for-privacy@aolbin.com wrote:

There's also the grease and rag method, as demonstrated here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w62c4NQDwP0&t7s

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wrote:

Not at all clear exactly what he did there or why it works.
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On 14/05/2018 20:07, Rod Speed wrote:

The guy does have a certain "style" admittedly. But he did explain it, the rag and grease are used as a seal and the bearing is removed hydraulically.
There is another video from someone with a more conventional style, this time using kitchen towel and water as the hydraulic seal.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ggsEewAg2YM

Just thought it might be useful to mention for where the use of heat might not be an option.
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He didn’t say anything at all about it being removed hydraulically and didn’t even explain that the thing you are hammering in needs to be a decent seal with the inner of the bearing for it to work either or that the cloth is necessary so that the grease doesn’t just get moved thru the bearing itself when the drift is hammered.

Yeah, very useful technique, but it does need to be pointed out that it works hydraulically, that was the problem with the original.
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On 14/05/18 20:07, Rod Speed wrote:

I THINK it is the 'hydrolyic' method. You fill the hole with grease and use something as a piston to compress the grease into the hole- the rag helps the seal. The pressure of the grease, forces the bearing out.
I've seen it done in a pilot bearing before (car gear box/clutch).
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wrote:

Yeah, that does make sense. It wasn’t clear that the original was actually in a blind hole, complete lack of any detail like that.
And presumably grease and cloth works better than paper towel and water too, not needing the drift to be such a good fit to the inner of the bearing.
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