Earthing a truck

On Thursday 08 August 2013 22:20 Matty F wrote in uk.d-i-y:

Lots of wheels and lots of tons to ensure reliable contact.

And if you look at a railway, the few bolted joints and expansion gaps have continuity straps welded or (separately) bolted on.
I would expect tram lines to have similar provision where needed,
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On 08/08/2013 22:20, Matty F wrote:

I was going to say they did some dodgy things back in those days...
But then I found this :-
http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/dirty-tracks-turning-yarra-trams-into-death-traps/story-e6frf7jo-1226076678879

How do they get by without room for expansion?
Cheers,
Colin.
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On Friday, August 9, 2013 9:39:45 AM UTC+12, Colin Stamp wrote:

The tram driver knows when there's no earth. All the lights go off and the controls won't work. In which case he immediately turns off the circuit breaker and the tram is safe. Besides the platform outside is insulated.

The rails are buried in concrete and don't get hot.
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On 08/08/2013 08:39, Matty F wrote:

But how did it work in the past? If it has rubber tyres and one overhead wire...
I still say, if it needs to be earthed to the rails, then something that slides on the rail is the perfect counterpoint to something that slides on a wire.
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Rod

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On Friday, August 9, 2013 7:02:36 AM UTC+12, polygonum wrote:

loaded closed. A wheel coming from the "wrong" track simply pushes against the spring and opens the point for each wheel. So the wheel or skate needs a few hundred kg of weight on it, to open the points. Or the wagon could ha ve a large spring forcing it down.


Perhaps there was some kind of skate dragged along in the rail with a showe r of sparks!



Yes, but getting past the track points is the problem. If there are two ska tes or wheels on the same track, maybe it's not a problem.
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On 03/08/2013 05:17, Matty F wrote:

Most train companies use standard 4x4 or pickups with a set of wheels that can swing down, and these go on track. The tyres still provide motive power, but steel wheels the guidance.
They also have small diggers that can do the same.
Anything towed as long as on a swivel attachment would follow truck
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