Earth the car?

I'm thinking of building in one of those Lidl battery chargers in the old car. So it can be left on float when not in use. The mains lead on those is only two core and the case plastic. I was considering a Buccaneer weather proof mains connector mounted in the body below the rear bumper. Should the car body be connected to mains earth?
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

No. If the battery charger is double insulated, then the only issue is preventing the chassis becoming live from a fault on the mains cable. Cover the mains lead in plastic conduit and ensure that it can't chafe or snag on anything. Make sure you plug in to an RCD-protected supply.
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they were saying:

Or do it the other way round, and plug the low-voltage into the car, keeping the charger.
Motorbike Optimate-style.
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That's what I have done.
My Halfords 'maintenance' charger came with both croc clips and also a set of flying leads that could be permanently bolted to the battery terminals with an in-line shrouded connector that matches the one on the charger. So to do a trickle charge, I simply open the bonnet and quickly hook up the flying leads to the charger. A red/green led indicates when the battery is fully charged.
David
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The extra-low voltage option would be by far the safest solution. If you really do want to put a 230v mains supply into the car then use a 3 core flex with a trailing socket and a 3 pin mains rated connector at the car end. Earth the car via the earth pin of the connector. Also use a supply with 30mA RCD protection (which all sockets rated at less than 20A, intended to supply equipment for use out of doors should have for additional personal protection in the event of a fault)
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Voltage drop in the cables screws with measuring float voltage. Where this is done commercially, it's a 4-lead setup back to the sense input.
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In article

Rather guessed something like that would apply.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On Wed, 16 Dec 2009 04:39:49 -0800 (PST), Andy Dingley wrote:

How about a nice hefty battery cable to a proper Anderson connector? You can keep only the low voltage on the car then and there'd be next to no voltage drop on the extra length of cable with the low current of a charger and the large CSA. You'd also have the added bonus that you could use the connector for a plug in set of jump leads. I keep meaning to get around to doing this on my kit-car.
SteveW
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I'd rather a neater way. The charger will fit nicely in a dead space alongside the spare wheel.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 16 Dec, 09:51, Adrian wrote:

Or milk-float style?
http://groups.google.co.uk/group/uk.d-i-y/browse_thread/thread/f52f8ea9ffc5d323/58642746b0dfc4e8
Owain
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http://groups.google.co.uk/group/uk.d-i-y/browse_thread/thread/f52f8ea9ffc5d323/58642746b0dfc4e8
That is a seriously inefficient charger.. 40x240 >> 70x72
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Dave Osborne pretended :

I do it the other way around...
Lidl charger is in a bracket, up in the garage roof, with a 12v cable fitted with a ciggy plug dangling down to car. As I park, I pull the ciggy plug in and plug it in. The ciggy socket has to be the type which is on all the time, which depends upon the car.
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That's fine if you have a garage...
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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I have wondered why that varies between manufacturers. Mine does, and it's very useful to leave a camera or phone tucked away and on charge sometimes.
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snipped-for-privacy@gglz.com expressed precisely :

Better would be cars fitted with a switch so the driver could select how he wanted the socket to operate.
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In message

Worse than that, it varies between models from the same manufacturer. Bloody stupid idea.

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London SW

How about "dodgem car" style.
Park one wheel on a metal plate and some kind of ceiling contact. Ground the plate as well.
I've got no idea how many ohms a tyre would present in circuit...but surely a small enough figure to trickle charge a battery?
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Vortex4 explained :

Several megs at least, so no.
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Harry (M1BYT) (L)
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Many many years ago when I had a vehicle with an unreliable battery I did something like that. Two radio aerials on the car roof one connected to + other to the body work. Hanging in the garage a couple of wire coat hangers stuck in a wooden beam and connected to the charger. aerials touched hangers and connection made without faffing around with plugs.
G.harman
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk explained :

To do that the more modern way, you would have the mains connected primary winding of a transformer hanging from the ceiling at a suitable height and the secondary winding on the car roof.
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