Drilling upwards.

I need to drill a number of holes upwards through porcelain tiles on the 'ceiling' of a window reveal. I have some arthritis in my shoulders which makes pushing upwards painful for any length of time. And having drilled a number of holes in these tiles already on the walls 'a length of time' is what it takes - about 10 minutes drilling with a diamond bit per hole. Any bright ideas about some form of adjustable prop that would provide the upwards pressure on the drill?
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*Remember: First you pillage, then you burn.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On Mon, 04 Aug 2008 23:28:37 +0100, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Something involving a broom handle and a cartridge gun? Really flash, fit a compression spring in there as well, old valve spring might be a bit to hard. I think the really tricky bit is going to be getting a secure and safe coupling to the back of the drill, with the pressure applied in line with the drill "axle".
--
Cheers
Dave.




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Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

10 minutes seems excessive. What I would do would be...
1 - use a hammer and gently tap the end of a long screw like a delicate centerpunch to break through the glaze on the tile.
2 - lightly drill through tile with no hammer action
3 - switch your SDS drill to hammer and slide a hole up into the lintel like..... well, like a "hot knife through butter"
I suspect the problem is the concrete lintel above all else. If you _really_ nead a bit of pressure what about one of those helping-hand type things oft. used to hold plasterboard to the ceiling while it's being screwed. or... modify an old cartridge skeleton gun somehow so it shoves a bit of broom handle up through the end as you squeeze the trigger?
Just a middle of the night idea :)
Pete
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http://www.GymRatZ.co.uk - Fitness+Gym Equipment.
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Bottle jack? or even the cars scissor jack,
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How big are your windows?
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On 5 Aug, 01:19, "www.GymRatZ.co.uk"

I'm not convinced you've seen the 'porcelain tile' bit of Dave's post. Breaking the glaze doesn't happen, going through the biscuit easily doesn't happen ...
And IIRC Dave has a Victorian place so it's not likely to be a concrete lintel.
But yes, 10 mins per hole sounds excessive.
Me, I'd try a new diamond bit (they wear too damn quickly for my liking), light pressure only, and rigging up some sort of continuous lubrication, even if that's only a bit of a trcikle out of the end of the shower hose.
John
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In article

Actually a centre punch does work well for starting the hole.

Actually this one has as it's a new window - but it's dry lined with plasterboard.

I take it easy given the cost of the drills.

I've found the B&D ones that Screwfix sell that include a lubrication kit work very well - but that won't work on a ceiling. So was intending just regularly dipping it in water. I don't want to soak things.
It's interesting you say light pressure. I've found short bursts of very high pressure at low speed works best. Are you suggesting a higher speed at low pressure? If that works better it would alleviate my problem somewhat.

--
Is the hardness of the butter proportional to the softness of the bread?*

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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I tend to use the mini holesaw style of diamond bit, so a centre punched start isn't much help - I normally start the hole at an angle, then pivot the drill until it's perpendicular to the tile.

My employer pays for my drills ... But in smaller sizes the ones sold by Leyland SDM (Boa, I think) are pretty good and not overly expensive.

I tend to use as high a speed as I can, plenty of water, and only as much pressure as needed - it normally starts off light, then builds up as I decide I'm bored of that hole ...
Haven't - touch wood - been defeated yet
John
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In article

Doesn't give an accurate position, though on the rough surface tiles I've got. I centre punch then use a multi-purpose 6mm drill to break the glaze and give a centre for the diamond one. That way I get the hole in exactly the right place.
--
*Snowmen fall from Heaven unassembled*

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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I use a normal centre punch. These are thick hard porcelain tiles which may be used as floor ones as well, and take a lot of breaking - as I discovered when removing one with a flaw in it.

Heh heh - you've not come across them, then?

I'm only concerned about the tiles.

But what would hold the cartridge gun?

--
*Time is the best teacher; unfortunately it kills all its students.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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London SW

Sees no one has the brains to figure this one out logically and practically,so....
Know anyone with an old B&D drill stand? take out its normal pole and replace with one a few inchs short of the ceiling to window ledge. turn the stands drill anchoring retainer upside down,place drill mounted stand on window ledge and positon it for correct area to drill,push the drill upto the ceiling and use the drill lever to put pressure on the drilling this will enable you to drill like normal instead of upwards.
:-) I think that deserves some merit don't you?
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I have got just such a beast and the drill which fits it complete with speed control. Made redundant when I bought a pillar drill. I'll investigate it.
--
*I don't know what your problem is, but I'll bet it's hard to pronounce

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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London SW

A further investigation since you have one but this depends whether you have one of those Aldi plasterboard props and whether its the same circumfrence as the B&D stand pole?
Take the mechanicle drill mount off the stand and discard the stand and pole.
Get the Aldi prop and mount the drill anchoring mechanics upside down on the prop,use the prop to align the drill to the hole and use the lever on the drill mount. ;-)
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In an earlier contribution to this discussion,

You beat me to it - I was going to suggest the same.
You don't really need to replace the pole - you just need to stand the base on some blocks of wood on the window cill so that the whole thing is at the right height. You'll still have to push upwards on the lever - but with a mechanical advantage, and probably in a more comfortable position than if you were pushing directly on the drill. You could even extend the lever by sliding a tube over it, but you'd probably need an assistant to steady the whole thing.
--
Cheers,
Roger
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London SW

Yeah but I went one better...see an update post.
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In uk.d-i-y, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

If it was me I'd be looking to construct a platform, on which I could comfortable lie on my back, that would put me in the right position to hold the drill comfortably.
--
Mike Barnes

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a
the
Being on your back whilst drilling upwards is potentially a dangerous position to be in and the chance you moving fast in that position are minimal.
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agreed, if anything happens and drill slips from your grasp ...... ouch!
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London SW

I can fully appreciate your situation. I have recently had to drill 14 holes in porcelain tiles and it is hard work. Took me about 5 mins per hole using a 8mm diamond core drill. Drilling upwards is even harder as you also need to use water to keep the drill bit cool or it won't last 5 minutes.
Can you make some sort of jig out of scrap timber and use a scissor type car jack to apply the upwards pressure?
Good luck.
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For an accurate position, I start with a centre punch, then move on to a 4mm tile drill or universal one to completely break the glaze to the right size - then change to a 6mm one to do the same - then go over to the 6mm diamond core drill with plenty of pauses and dipping in water. I'm in no rush and would prefer not to buy lots of these expensive drills. The first hole I drilled ruined a pukka tile drill by going too fast. A cheap Screwfix diamond one has managed about a dozen being careful - but is now knackered. I've just started with a DeWalt one which appears to be better quality - as well it might at the thick end of 20 quid.

That was my original thought too - but drills don't tend to have flat backs so likely to slip off the jack.
--
*No word in the English language rhymes with month, orange, silver,purple

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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