Downlighters - how many in a kitchen?

On 07/10/2019 20:38, ARW wrote:

I swapped 50W halogen GU10s for 7 or 8W LEDs in out second toilet and they are actually far brighter!
In the main bathroom, we have MR16 LEDs and one 35W halogen (the PSU is unstable without the halogen and I've not got round to replacing it yet). There is little difference between them, unless you know that one is halogen and look for it. Even then it is only if you look directly at it.
SteveW
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In the bathroom at our last house, I replaced ceiling tungsten GU10s with LED ones - maybe MiniSun - and the beam angle was not as wide... or at least, it had sharper cutoff at the edge, so the were more noticeable dark areas between the lights. Likewise in the kitchen, in a ceiling mounted fitting with five spotlights that could be pointed in different directions: it took a bit of time to adjust the angles of the lights to give sufficient light on the worktops after changing tungsten for MiniSun,
But in out new house, with a grid of LED GU10s every 1 m to 1.3 m in the kitchen and bedroooms, the lighting seems very even.
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I can. ;-)
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 08/10/2019 16:27, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

With the warm white I sometimes cannot tell the difference.
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wrote:

As I was replacing tungsten GU10 with warm white LED GU10, I turned the lights on part-way through the process and I could not distinguish one from the other, either by looking at the lights in the ceiling or looking at the room that they illuminated. Putting my hand near them, the difference in heat output was *very* noticeable, though ;-)
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On 09/10/2019 20:12, NY wrote:

It sort of buggers up the old riddle of three lights in a room with no windows each controlled by individual switches outside the room and you have to work out which lamp is controlled by which switch but once you have entered the room you can no longer touch the light switches.
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Adam

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Sounds like they needed to replace their electrician. ;-)
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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They have a slight green tint compared to halogen at full belt. And not as continuous a spectrum. Which can make colours change between daylight and artificial. But are getting there.
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On 10/10/2019 14:35, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Another thing that has really improved is the number of failures after a few weeks.
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No, the beam angle is the total, so if it says 38 degrees it's 38 degrees.
There is a whole suite of articles on the Philips lighting website covering the intricacies of lighting design, the lamp tech specs etc. They could be still there but I can't seem to find them right now.
Also in the case of a kitchen the working plane is 900mm or so above the floor and that makes a difference to the effective spread area and hot and cold spots compared to simply illuminating a floor used for a passageway. The shadows caused by occupancy in a kitchen can be significant, similarly those around a bathroom basin or a dressing room mirror.
Also what various people, even very experienced lighting professionals and published texts consider suitable lighting levels does not suit everyone. For instance If we'd listened to 'a pro' a windowless shower room would be lit at about 150-200 lux. As installed and recently measured it's circa 1000 lux and that is only just acceptable to SWMBO. It doesn't seem bright, clearly there is some on the fly adaption by the eye but 150 lux would be dire. But with careful positioning of the light sources there are no nasty shadows.
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On 08/10/2019 13:29, The Other Mike wrote:

That's why downlighters need to be quite close together.
Bill
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Well, it probably depends on the angle with which they give maximum light and how high they are. Ideally you want some overlap to stop shadows, but too close together and it starts to look like some illuminated art exhibit used to like the golden light from such things, but they got so hot of course, I guess modern LEDs would be colder though whether they are reliable seems to vary from what I read here. Brian
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On 06/10/2019 21:34, snipped-for-privacy@aolbin.com wrote:

I would consider LED panels rather than downlighters.
https://cpc.farnell.com/search?st=led%20panel
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On 07/10/2019 10:20, dennis@home wrote:

I was tempted, but they seem to give a diffuse light and I'm not sure how well that would work with a slightly high ceiling.
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On 07/10/2019 13:20, snipped-for-privacy@aolbin.com wrote:

the first one is 3600 lumen so it won't be dark if you fit a couple of those.
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On 07/10/2019 13:20, snipped-for-privacy@aolbin.com wrote:

Outdoors, cloudy-bright gives a diffuse light and that works very well. And the ceiling out there is very high.
Bill
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On 07/10/2019 20:50, Bill Wright wrote:

;-)
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snipped-for-privacy@aolbin.com wrote in

Get ones with a separate power supply to help heat disserpation. I have 8 Halers H2 Pro. https://www.collingwoodlighting.com/by-application/kitchen-lighting
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On 06/10/2019 21:34, snipped-for-privacy@aolbin.com wrote:

If you go for something with a wide beam angle like:
https://trade.ledhut.co.uk/8w-integrated-smd-led-down-lights-with-pc-reflector.html
Then you will need far fewer than if you go for traditional MR16 style spotlights. I would expect a 3x3 grid would work in a room of that size.
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On 06/10/2019 21:34, snipped-for-privacy@aolbin.com wrote:

I'd only add to the comments already made that there's a trade-off between wide beam angle and glare - especially with fittings where the lamp is not recessed. People seem to vary greatly as to how (un)bothered they are.
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Robin
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