Do you English...

Do you english still install timber windows in the outside leaf ? .....
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On 09/05/2015 15:57, Jim GM4DHJ in the trailer park ... wrote:

So, what wrong with the Scots, Welsh and Irish, that you don't want to know about them?
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Colin Bignell

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because due to the wet climate the Scots have never done it ........
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You mean they use cast iron ones? Or just have a hole in the wall? We all know that windows are for soft southerners.
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On 09/05/2015 17:37, Jim GM4DHJ in the trailer park ... wrote:

Generally Scottish crofts have solid walls, so all their windows are in the outer leaf, as there is no other.
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Colin Bignell

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Jim GM4DHJ wrote:

Can we say "bollocks" children ?
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Presumably he knows about the Scots already.
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in message

Yes but only in posh houses.
Most windows now are uPVC. New and replacement. And doors.
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Jim GM4DHJ in the trailer park ... wrote:

    No, only install PVC or aluminium windows.
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On Saturday, 9 May 2015 15:57:47 UTC+1, Jim GM4DHJ in the trailer park ... wrote:

not often
NT
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On 09/05/15 15:57, Jim GM4DHJ in the trailer park ... wrote:

very often on quality houses. Almost never on cheap ones
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On Sunday, 10 May 2015 08:06:28 UTC+1, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

Normally they go in the inner leaf for fire safety reasons
NT
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On 10/05/2015 11:52, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Do they?! How does that help fire safety?
My house was built in the 1960's with cavity walls and wooden window frames in the outer leaf. All the original (single glazed) windows have been replaced with double glazed units in thermal break aluminium frames - again fitted in the outer leaf, set back about 40mm from the face of the brickwork. This then only requires a fairly narrow cill on the outside but provides a decent cill on the inside which is wide enough to accommodate flower pots, etc. (or other miscellaneous junk!)
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On Sunday, 10 May 2015 14:37:09 UTC+1, Roger Mills wrote:

Flames licking up the outside take longer to ignite the frame, retarding fire spread. Inner leaf windows have been standard for this reason for a very long time. Outer leaf windows tend to be found on very old houses that predate this.
NT
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On 10/05/2015 23:09, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Most fires are internal, where there's combustible material. You would have thought a window on an external leaf would be better?

I haven't seen a house with a window on the inner leaf for a long time. They generally have wide inner sills and adorn ornaments and the like.
Are you sure you're talking of the UK?
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wrote:

He's talking drivel. Windows are to keep the weather out, as is the outer leaf. Hence the window has to be linked/continuous with to the outer leaf.
Plastic windows are a fire hazard. The plastic gives off highly toxic fumes in a fire.
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On 10/05/2015 18:48, harryagain wrote:

Are all of your window frames wooden or Crittal steel then?
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wrote:

Yes.

Nope. Perfectly possible to have the windows recessed in the wall and on the inner leaf. No real point in doing that tho.

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Just looking at the uPVC windows fitted 5 years ago to this 1930s house, to replace all the preexisting. It seems to vary. The window of this room is on the inner leaf, with vertical closure strips to cover the cavity gap. That's a brick wall. Some windows around the kitchen area are on what must be the outer leaf; these are rendered walls (I was going to say pebble dash but I'm not sure what that is.)
Then we have a new porch on the side of the house, built a couple of years ago. There, definitely on the outer leaf.
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On Monday, 11 May 2015 00:08:01 UTC+1, Fredxxx wrote:

from where they spread to being external, and set other houses alight. Its not as big an issue these days with a fire service.

Most houses have recessed windows. Maybe I'm wrong about how they're fixed though.
NT
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