Diagonal bracing for garden gate

I've been making a featheredge garden gate this weekend, and have just got to fit the diagonal bracing. Most gates I've seen in the Sheds and garden centres have the diagonals parallel - bottom left to centre right, and centre left to top right. One or two have them meeting in the middle - bottom left to centre right, and centre right to top left.
Any reason one should be better than the other?
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Jeff

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On Mon, 14 May 2018 07:14:42 +0100, Jeff Layman wrote:

Surely it's top to opening side and bottom to hinge side - L & R have nothing to do with it. I assume it's so that the brace is in compression and that avoids having the joints under tension.
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On Monday, 14 May 2018 08:16:53 UTC+1, PeterC wrote:

+1
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On Mon, 14 May 2018 07:14:42 +0100, Jeff Layman

An X (or XX for wide gates) design is pretty common, addressing TNP's comments in both ways. https://bit.ly/2GcdVfD
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Chris

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Well all things being equal, I would say one big brace which is lower on the hinged edge. Those with two braces and a central bar, are a little harder to call of course. My old woodworking master at school always baked the doors so that the hanging weight was compressing the cross stay, not pulling it off. Brian
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For 'clever' gates made by good joiners/carpenters maybe that's true but in my bodjoinery world the brace will be on one side or the other so the joints will be in shear! :-)
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Chris Green
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The first is mechanically better.
The second looks better if you are an obsessive. .
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On Monday, 14 May 2018 07:14:45 UTC+1, Jeff Layman wrote:

the differences are fairly trivial. I prefer the brace in tension as it tends to pull the door together if any bits get loose.
NT
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On 14/05/2018 07:46, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

Compression - always, and a tight fit, unless you want the latch side of the gate to slowly droop.
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On 14/05/2018 07:14, Jeff Layman wrote:

We had one where the brace went from hinge-top to lath bottom. The joints opened up, and it sagged. So I put a wire across the opposite diagonal, and a little tension got it back in place.
(OK, a lot of tension. Two strands, and a bit of wood wound around and around to twist the wires.)
Andy
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