Damp wall

Our small bedroom gets damp on the inside of the North facing wall. I
have checked the external render, etc. and there is no sign of anywhere
which matches the internal damp. The damp is mainly in a built in
wardrobe but also behind the bed. Generally low down.
Any suggestions as to cause and cure?
Reply to
John
Wait till the bad weather comes in and then observe the the heavy rain outside as to where the damp is apparent inside. Damp takes a while to dry out particulary if the brickwork is porouses?
Reply to
George
Sounds like condensation on the inside of cold parts of the wall. Can you get some air flow to the affected areas?
Guy
Reply to
Guy Dawson
The cause is almost certainly condensation. These two places will have the coldest walls and trapped air. The wall inside the cupboard is colder than anywhere else in the house and that's where the water in the air condenses. Same for behind the bed.
Cure is to insulate the walls (cavity wall insulation) if possible and, most importantly, improve ventilation in the house and use things like cooker hood extractor fans and bathroom extractor fans. In the short term line both areas with polystyrene tiles but this isn't really a cure - it simply moves the condensation elsewhere.
Reply to
Peter Parry
Totally agree, though along with the other suggestions I have had success in a similar situation with the thin polystyrene sheet under wallpaper. I guess any remaining condensation ends up mainly on the windows but at least that can be wiped off.
Andy
Reply to
Andy Cap
On Sat, 20 Oct 2007 17:23:12 GMT, "George" wrote:
Sounds like condensation on the coldest and unventilated parts of a rendered wall. Similar to problem that was discussed some weeks ago.
Maris
Reply to
Maris
In article , Peter Parry writes
Solid walls so cavity wall insulation not an option. I'll try a fan (on cold) to move the air around in the worst areas and look at the ventilation in that room.
Thanks
Reply to
John
Definitely condensation then.
A fan won't do much as it will simply stir the moist air around. You need to reduce the amount of moisture by extracting it. In the short term put a layer of insulation on the affected areas. Either the thin polystyrene wallpaper made for the job or, for the wardrobe where the problem will be worst, line the walls inside the wardrobe with polystyrene tiles. As I said it doesn't eliminate the problem but if the condensation moves to better ventilated areas it may not be so noticeable. Increasing the heating in the affected rooms also helps.
Reply to
Peter Parry
Condensation due to the wall being cold and uninsulated, the room being unventilated and not heated enough.
Dry line it and crack a window open.
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
In article , snipped-for-privacy@atics.co.uk writes
Thanks, window opened a bit, heating turned up a bit, wait and see. Plans for insulation behind wallpaper being made.
Reply to
John
Hi,
It's a combination of cold wall and high room humidity.
I'd start by insulating behind bed and wardrobe with polystyrene sheet, and leaving the bedroom door open overnight.
If polystyrene will be unsightly, pulling the bed/wardrobe away from the wall might work OK.
cheers, Pete.
Reply to
Pete C
FWIW, I agree too. It was nice to see that the 'last resort', i.e. a de-humidifier didn't get a mention in this thread.
Oops! I shouldn't have mentioned de-humidifiers... ;-)
Steve
Reply to
Steve

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