Cutting a Joist

Hi all,
I'm in the process of installing an electric shower in my upstairs Bathroom. I was hoping to install a Fan-Light on the centre line of the bath, above the shower but I've noticed that bang on this centre line is a joist.
There is nothing resting on this particular joist on this side of the House. But on the other side of the house is the Cold water tank. The joist is between two others supporting this.
So... in order in install the extractor I would need to cut this joist.
Is this advisable? Even if I rework the the cut ends of the joist on to the neighbouring joists eg tie each side onto the two outlying joists?
All Joists in the roof-space are approx 700mm apart but the joist in question is between two others.. so only in this part of the House, three joist are close together at 350mm apart (I would say to support the Water Tank.
What's the best way around this?
Thanks loads, Shay
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Move the fan\light doobrie.
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Stuart.
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On Mon, 30 Apr 2007 21:36:40 +0100, Lurch

Actually, I'd probably not fit a fan light in a bath, only ever installed them in shower enclosures. In a bath I'd put a couple of downlighters in and stick the fan in the middle of the bathroom.
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Stuart.
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I once installed a fan-light in a bath, but the only way I could stop the water running out of it was to sit on it and then it made my bottom go all tingly with electricity.
--
Bobby Botchups.

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On Mon, 30 Apr 2007 21:20:20 GMT, Clive Mitchell

ROFL.
btw, I happened across your site a while ago whilst looking for something to build. Thanks. :)
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Stuart.
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Was it a nice live halogen chandelier? So pretty and yet so deadly.
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Clive Mitchell
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Clive Mitchell wrote:

I'm sure one of my Dangerous Books for Boys had how to make a small arc lamp for one's model theatre.
' course, that would have been in the days of DC mains?
Owain
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Owain wrote:

Sounds like that classic "/The Boy Electrician/".

Not necessarily.
--
Andy

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The Boy Electrician used to show how to make an X-ray unit for fun.
That project was censored in later editions!
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Clive Mitchell
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On Tue, 01 May 2007 10:55:46 GMT, Clive Mitchell

Erm, yeah, umm, decided to pass on that, what with the low ceilings and kids running around.
The RGB doobrie is a handy doobrie, for some other applications not involving red green or blue.
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Hmm. Yes . Maybe better for high ceilings or better yet, not made at all. :)

They've been used for flame emulation, star cloths, general random dimming of a fixed colour (usually blue) and a strobe effect for bikes.
That kit has been a useful source of pocket money for me.
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Clive Mitchell
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Shay wrote:

Shay,
In technical terms you "cut and trim" the ceiling rafters (joists). I have put a diagram on tinypic.com - click on this link:
http://i19.tinypic.com/68bynn6.jpg
If there is no loading on the trimmed rafter, then ignore the 'tusk tenon' joints and simply hold everything together with 'big' nails or screws - if there is a loading, then joist hangers will be your best bet.
A picture of one is shown here:
http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?id 149&tsh132
There are different sizes, so get a size to suit your situation and these are simply nailed to the rafters.
Also, what is shown, may be slightly over the top for what you want - but simply adapt it to suit.
Hope this is of some help?
Brian G
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Thanks loads Brian,
Excellent drawing ;-)
Shay
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Shay wrote:

You're welcome Shay, but I cannot take the credit for the diagram - it came from a reference book that I bought some 40 years ago as a rather new apprentice 'chippy' (as you can see, everything is in 'old money') LOL
Brian G
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Brian G wrote:

That's designed for building into masonry really. For a timber to timber joint an ordinary jiffy hanger would be fine:
http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?cId 1228&tss534&idd910
Fold the excess flap over the top of the joist, and nail the blighters on with a square twist nail in every hole:
http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?cId 0089&tss666&id788
--
Cheers,

John.

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