Cutouts in kitchen worktops

I need to make the cutouts for the hob and sink. Worktop is 40mm.
Is a (plunge) router the correct way to do this ? If so any recommendations on size, ones to buy or hire, etc. If not, what is ?
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You could use a router for this - a half inch one would be appropriate, but be aware that nothing that you can buy for under 150 is worth having in 1/2" models. One technique is to then clamp a straight edge at theappropriate distance from the line and run the router base against it. As long as you take care with the setup you will get very good results. It's advisable only to cut a few mm depth at a time (<10) with a 1/2" router and (say) a 1/2" straight cutting bit.
For this application, the alternative would be a jig saw. Generally, the lip of the item will cover the worst indiscretions so cutting has to be reasonable but not perfect.
It really depends on which tool you would expect to use more afterwards.
.andy
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wrote:

===========================Er! the 59 Jobbie from Argos is and it's a JCB amazing. Watch the word wrap http://www.argos.co.uk/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Search?storeId 001&catalo gId51&langId=-1&searchTerms=routers
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Go here to get around that. www.tinyurl.com If you add the short cut into your browser it automatically copies your current clipboard selection for you. ..
SJW A.C.S. Ltd.
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wrote:

At 1200W in a 1/2" router it really isn't worth bothering to have the larger collett.. This is too little power to be useful in this size of machine.
.andy
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wrote:

wrap
o
===========================================Bit odd this the 1500W is 49 and the 1200W 59 I think the prices are mixed up.?
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mixed
I noticed that as well. Can't see anything missing from the cheaper model.
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wrote:

The sink has curved edges on all sides. I did cut a previous worktop with a jigsaw but found the blade bent over as I went round the bend, causing quite an undercut outside of the desired region. Hence my thoughts on using a router.
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Can't see why that would be a problem though, they always do that. I've never actually seen anyone use anything other than a jigsaw for this job. (Well there was the time I saw someone using a circular saw, but I think that's excessive). ..
SJW A.C.S. Ltd.
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wrote:

with
using
=============================================Then go for the Router if you need precision cuts. Iv'e used a Jiggy on work your about to undertake and I thought it was a crap piece of power tool for such a job. My opinion.
Grouch
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wrote:

with
using
Well there's jigsaws and there's jigsaws, and the difference between good and bad ones is dramatic when it comes to accurate cuts.
This is one application where I'd hire a meaty industrial one for the day from a hire shop if you've only got access to a DIY type saw. The roller should be as close to the work as possible, and many cheaper saws have unnacceptably high and inadequate roller supports, which gives rise to the blade flexion that you experienced. Alloy gear casing is usually a pointer to a more capable tool (witness the Bosch GST2000).
My previous jigsaw would not cut square through anything over 1/2" thick. My current one does, with ease.
If you're going round tight radii then you don't want the standard width blades, you can get much narrower ones which go round the corners with ease.
-- Richard Sampson
email me at richard at olifant d-ot co do-t uk
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A drill and a jigsaw are all you need. ..
SJW A.C.S. Ltd.
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In an earlier contribution to this discussion,

A jigsaw is the obvious solution - preferably with a special blade which cuts on the down-stroke so as not to chip the laminate surface (unless you cut from the bottom - in which case, an ordinary blade is ok - but it's then more difficult to get the hole in the right place!).
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Not so important for cutting out holes for sinks and hobs, the overlap will cover any chips. Although a downward cutting blade is the better option, but not neccesary. ..
SJW A.C.S. Ltd.
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In an earlier contribution to this discussion,

I did say *preferably* - not that it was mandatory! You appear to agree.
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You can cut the whole lot out with a router, however this can be pretty hard on the cutting edges.
By far the best way is to use a jigsaw to cut most of the material out, leaving about 3mm or so to clean up with the router.
Don't forget that after you've cut out the hole in the worktop you need to "paint" the exposed edges with PVA adhesive. This forms a water barrier preventing the ingress of water which can swell and crack the worktop.
PoP
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wrote:

[lots of crap snipped]
=======================================================A rubber sealant is best.
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Hi
I used a circular saw to make a rectangular cutout for a 'full size' kitchen sink.
Worked like a dream compared with my (possibly underpowered, bendy bladed) jigsaw.
Make sure you understand where the blade is on the CS relative to the guide plate, cut the four sides as far as possible with maximum blade exposed, then finish into each corner with handsaw or jigsaw.
I think a router is over the top re jigging, my adversity to plunge cutting, etc but I'm sure others have had great success with them.
If you're hiring, I'd get a meaty jigsaw which takes strong blades that won't deflect under use.
HTH IanC
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