Corn type LED lamps

Would I be correct in suggesting that corn type LED lamps are best suited to situations where the light required is at right angles to the axis of the light please? As in a outside lantern type of fitting..
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I've got a huge one in my living room (150W equivalent I think). It's got LEDs round the sides and the end. It's mounted vertically (pendant fitting way up), and lights the room as well as a CFL stick or an incandescent.
I much prefer them to CREE ones with a smaller number of very hot LEDs that don't last very long. But my favourite are striplight LEDs (look just like flourescent tubes till you turn them on then the light is much nicer (no flicker)).
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On Mon, 22 Aug 2016 16:55:03 +0100, Harry Bloomfield wrote:

I don't know about these "Corn" type LED lamps of which you speak, unless you're referring to the "Corn Cob" type LED lamp. Assuming this is the type you mean, then yes, imo! They'd be better suited, especially if the luminary orients the lamp in the "Cap Down Burning" position to avoid overheating the electronics in the base[1] due to the very poor ventilation characteristics most such outside luminaries are cursed with in the interests of keeping them reasonably proofed against rain ingress (the tiny breather holes, designed to prevent build up of damp and exclude most insects larger than an Earwig, don't really count as ventilation holes for the purposes of keeping the lamp cooled).
[1] For lamps rated less than 20W, such "electronics" may be nothing more than a "capacitive dropper" rather than a built in sophisticated constant current driver module. If a suitably high temperature capacitor is used, they may be able to tolerate much higher temperatures than a "transistorised" switching regulator module could ever hope to cope with.
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Johnny B Good

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Johnny B Good wrote:

First came LED corn cob lamps, e.g.
<
http://img.dxcdn.com/productimages/sku_45375_1.jpg

Then lamps built around COB (chip on board) LEDs where the bare modules come in various shapes and sizes, but typically submerged in yellow phosphor e.g.
<
http://img.dxcdn.com/productimages/sku_373438_1.jpg

Now there are corn-cob style lamps using COB LEDs!
<
http://img.dxcdn.com/productimages/sku_239373_1.jpg

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On Mon, 22 Aug 2016 18:26:40 +0100, Andy Burns wrote:

IMO it's best to avoid "corn cob"; yes, "corn" is because the lamp/LEDs look a bit like corn-on-the-cob, fair enough, but, although some corn are COB most are SMDs. I've some v. good COB lamps, with the LEDs on v. translucent ceramic blades and they give good dispersion and stay cool.
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On Monday, 22 August 2016 16:55:09 UTC+1, Harry Bloomfield wrote:

Have a look at this.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lJNsK4BNSDs

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On 22/08/2016 16:55, Harry Bloomfield wrote:

I like the filament type LEDs for their omnidirectional output. They look nicer than cob type, but they are normally only available in 60W equivalence power ratings.
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John.
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Corn cob LEDs are often a way of using many very cheap and inefficient low powered LEDs, rather than properly.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On Tuesday, 23 August 2016 10:57:47 UTC+1, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Some use sm LEDs and unisolated PSUs, meaning touching them when powered may cause a nasty shock. All part of the fun of buying from China.
NT
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