Chainsaw purchase

I could do with a chainsaw .... have around 150 Leylandi to cut out
The diam of trunk is typically 8" ... a few are larger Thinking I will take first cut at shoulder height (or maybe even standing on a hop-up step) - but not intending to climb tree or use of a ladder. Then do final cut at just above ground level as 2nd cut.
I have a couple of questions - for those that use chainsaws frequently.
Size .... is 18" a suitable size for this job ? if so would aim to get 50cc engines (some are 40cc)
Make .... looking on eBay, plenty of makes to buy - cheap deals on new ones. Thinking of avoiding any 'unknown makes'
Of the following any to avoid or are a particularly useful choice (or any particular models of these makes)
McCulloch Husqvarna Parker Sthil (though price may be too high for this make)
Advice welcome -
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Get some training. Chainsaws are *dangerous*.
Buy a good set of chainsaw files and learn to use them. Blunt chainsaws are even more dangerous.
Buy a set of ballistic trousers and a hard hat with ear and face protection.
Don't do any cutting on a hop-up. Falling off one with a running chainsaw is dangerous.
[20 lines snipped]

I have a McCulloch. It's a pig to start and I doubt it would stand up to professional use (it's mostly plastic) , but it works well enough for occasional use.

Never heard of them.

Every tree surgeon I've ever employed uses Stihl kit.

Consider getting someone in. Felling trees is dirty, hard, dangerous work.
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I was just thinking that, the one time I ever held one it was like some demented gyroscope with vibration. Don't go near one. Brian
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My Stihl hedge cutter is very nice to use, smooth, very quiet, but very powerful. (Was recommended here at the time.)
Buying it was a pain in the arse - Stihl won't let their distributors send out by courier - you have to pick up in person, and they require their distributor to run through safety with you. For chain saws, you had to bring your training certificate with you, or you wouldn't be allowed to take it away (although I wasn't buying a chain saw so that didn't apply).
Don't know if they're all as compliant as the ones around me, and this was probably ~10 years ago).

and will be able to chip the felled trees and drive them away.
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On 29/11/2017 18:31, Andrew Gabriel wrote:

I got one of their "kombi" motor units to replace my second crap ryobi (you can just about get the ryobi and husqvarna accessories to fit it). That has been exceptionally good. Easy to start, light, powerful, great fuel economy, and will run in any position or angle.

The place I recommended elsewhere in the thread, claim on their web site that this is what they have send one of their staff to deliver it in person so they can do the "training". Then it turns up by courier ;-)

Yup something to be said for that... might be pricey for 100+ trees though.
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On 29/11/17 20:19, John Rumm wrote:

If you have an ounce of common sense - so basically its not for remoaners - chainsaw safety is intelligent common sense plus a bit of kit, though I never bothered. The salient points are all there on you tube videos and online articles.
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On Wed, 29 Nov 2017 20:19:58 +0000, John Rumm

I buy from the same firm and this ruse is because of Stihl's policy of not allowing mail order for power tools.
I would look as a Dolmar 420 as an easy to start and use semi professional saw.
Having said that, and despite having a stable of older Husqvarna and Stihl products, I have been using an Einhell 50cc saw which could be had for £80 in costco, I was given it for disposal in mint condition but no chain. I have put about 4 gallons of fuel through it and am half way through a chain and it's still running, it's light and for the price basically disposable should anything go wrong.
It has nowhere near the power of a Husqvarna 550 but unless you're doing production work so what.
AJH
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On Wednesday, 29 November 2017 18:31:46 UTC, Andrew Gabriel wrote:

The chips are far too useful to let them be taken away. Compost or mulch.
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On Fri, 1 Dec 2017 00:43:03 -0800 (PST), harry

If a conifer I think you are supposed to leave the chips to stand for a while to allow the sap to go away before using them for anything that is supposed to promote growth or protection for other plants?
Cheers, T i m
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On Tuesday, 28 November 2017 17:01:21 UTC, rick wrote:

If you can do it, electric chainsaws are cheaper, safer and more convenient. You will need all the safety kit and info. People get killed/injured using chainsaw.
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replying to harry, Iggy wrote: Agreed, electric was the best thing I ever did. Just like using a Hedge Trimmer, no problem in getting the stumps down to ground level and nothing to service...including the chain now, I popped on an Oregon Power Sharp.
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On 28/11/2017 17:28, harry wrote: ce may be too high for this make)

See 2200W versions for good price - Screwfix has a very good deal
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On Fri, 08 Dec 2017 23:05:55 +0000, rick wrote:

"safer"? in use? I don't think so. Perhaps harry means because they don't use petrol. "more convenient" - possibly - if you have a mains supply accessible.

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Yep. the driving force stops instantly and the chain brake works much better.

Fraid so.

Nope.

No possibly about it, most obviously when it stops when you are up a ladder etc.

Or have a generator.

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On 28/11/2017 17:01, rick wrote:

I'll add ... I have used chainsaws many times, and have had a basic chainsaw training course (by MOD) just looking at what to buy.
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On 28/11/2017 17:47, rick wrote:

I have a Ryobi which is probably about 18 inch. I have several Ryobi devices and reckon the mechanics sits somewhere in the middle between "budget" and Stihl / DeWalt. Did have to replace an oil pump gear on the chainsaw after not a great amount of use.
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Haven't gone down any further in this thread yet, but having read your [above]: then go buy a Stihl!
Huge's reply is really, really good. You may not need that information, but a lot of others reading this need it.
I personally have down-sized to my sole electric Bosch chainsaw, which is fabulous for the small scale domestic work that I do, and not as intimidating as a bloody petrol engine screaming away in your lughole.
However you have one big job on your hands there, so don't stint, Stihl, is what I'd say.
Now I'll read the rest of the thread ... a favourite topic in this group :-D
J.
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*blush* Thank you.
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On 28/11/2017 17:47, rick wrote:

If its a one off job and is within extension lead reach of mains electricity go electric. Cheap electric chainsaws are more reliable than cheap IC engines ones.
Mike
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wrote:

Or a suitable generator? Daughter used my electric saw at an Arb show (to try to do some carving) via her 2kW genny and whilst it actually 'worked', it was nowhere near as useable as her 'dime tip' carving saw (even if she had a suitable carving bar for the electric saw it was much heavier and bulky than her Stihl carving saw and the cable *did* keep getting in the way and hung up on stuff, potentially leading to some very dangerous situations).

I'd probably agree with that, however, if it went wrong (oil pump etc), I'm not sure how easy it would be to fix / get spares for (if you were bothered to etc).
Daughter has looked at some the latest battery powered kit and if money wasn't an option, might have a small battery saw and possibly a battery strimmer, for 'tidying up' rather than all day use.
Cheers, T i m
p.s. You can do some axe felling practice here: ;-) https://en.stihl.ca/chop-a-log.aspx
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