Bowsaw

Need to get a bowsaw for use this Winter as the spinney at the bottom of the garden has been advancing for a few years. Nothing too big: there's an ash tree that's about 10cm thick and will soon be tall enough to fall on the hose and some hawthorn of similar size.
I looked at this:
http://www.screwfix.com/prods/59875
which should be big enough and wondered if it's reasonable.
As for spare blades, there's only this:
http://www.screwfix.com/prods/63511
which gets v. bad reviews. Given that a blade will wear out or break before I've done the job, what are the alternatives? I prefer somewhere local rather than on t'net, so a shed is likely.
Cheers.
--
Peter.
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On Fri, 25 Sep 2009 18:01:16 +0100, PeterC wrote:

Why not try a local 'country' or farm store? Had my bowsaw for donkeys years and only on the second or third blade.
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The Wanderer

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On Fri, 25 Sep 2009 18:38:04 +0100, The Wanderer wrote:

Good point - there's a Central Wool Growers in Towcesetr.
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Peter.
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Because if it's like my one in Chepstow, it's green wellies for the Rangie and horsebox set, and I can't even afford their catfood.
Admittedly Abergavenny's is a bit more sensible and sells foot-rot cures for sheep.
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Bowsaws are quicker, but by the time you've gone and got one for such little wood, it would have been far quicker to get out a basic handsaw and do it. If you were doing a whole bunch of much bigger stuff then yes I'd get a bow.
NT
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NT wrote:

The other advantage is that I don't have to worry about damaging my carpentry tools with green wood, damp ground, and falling debris.
Andy
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On Fri, 25 Sep 2009 10:42:21 -0700 (PDT), NT wrote:

I've done that but when one is up a tree and holding on with one hand, the handsaw clogs up and gets stuck. I've other wood to cut up as well, so I felt that a bowsaw would just be easier.
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Peter.
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PeterC wrote:

And, next time you do the job you will have the saw ready ;-)
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Cheers,

John.

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Sounds good, if you like handsaws. I tend to use a circular for small trees these days, it has one major gotcha that's avoidable, and that's that wind or timber weight can close up on the blade, and the saw can then throw at the user. 2 solutions to this are: 1. for small trees, rope them pulled over to one side 2. use a cordless circ, which is low power enough to be easily held if it tries to kick.
NT
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NT wrote:

Are you completely insane? How did you type that post without fingers?
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Dave - The Medway Handyman
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On Sep 26, 4:24pm, "The Medway Handyman"

I've got a cordless thats so lower powered that kickback is easily held. It opens up new uses like plunge cutting and tree felling.
NT
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wrote:

held. It opens up new uses like plunge cutting and tree felling.
You could sort out your piles with that if you were careful.
Bill
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On Sat, 26 Sep 2009 18:29:50 +0100, Bill Wright wrote:

Operations for those are getting expensive due to soaring costs.
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Peter.
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NT wrote:

<SHUDDER>
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Dave - The Medway Handyman
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NT wrote:

That does not really sound like the best choice of tool IMHO....! Of the powered options, a chainsaw or reciprocating saw seem most useful.
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Cheers,

John.

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I inherited (wouldn't have bought it full price!) a B&D Alligator scissor-action chainsaw.
Up to its limits of needing a cable and only cutting 4" diameter, this thing is brilliant (albeit ultimately pointless). Easy to use, much easier / safer / lighter than another chainsaw, even electric, and even quicker than the usual chainsaw as the jaws make it possible to saw a branch overhead or unsupported.
For most stuff I'd prefer a hand saw (lightness) and 4" is quick enough to hand saw anyway. If you don't fancy the effort, or your lengthing felled branches, then it has its virtues.
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Andy Dingley wrote:

The other one I have found quite handy is a small pruning chain saw on the end of a petrol trimmer, with an extension bar you can trim fairly high stuff safely from the ground. There is also little danger of kickback type accidents since the pole puts the dangerous bit well out of reach. (just make sure you don't drop a branch on yourself!)
--
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John.

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On Mon, 28 Sep 2009 02:25:32 +0100, John Rumm wrote:

Not enough to warrant a powered tool and I prefer not to use them in the garden anyway (mowing about 250m^2 is useful exercise). I'll pop back to T's.
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Peter.
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PeterC wrote:

Got mine from Wickes, seems fine to me.
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On Fri, 25 Sep 2009 18:46:42 GMT, The Medway Handyman wrote:

Saw or blade? That blade has 3 v. bad reviews.
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Peter.
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