Block end of disused pipe

Behind a panel in my house is the exposed end of a long-disused waste pipe - quite likely there was once a sink there - which I suspect of being the source of an occasional bad smell.
Presumably I should cap it, but as you can see from this photo it's not a neat end:
http://www.cogsci.ed.ac.uk/~richard/pipe-end.jpg
The outside diameter is about 7cm.
There are flexible rubber caps for sale, e.g.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
but I doubt it could be attached securely. Would a piece of some kind of flexible rubber sheet and a jubilee clip do the trick?
-- Richard
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 26 May 2019 12:23:28 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@cogsci.ed.ac.uk (Richard Tobin) wrote:

It has a jubilee clip, just like you're suggesting for a piece of rubber sheet. In addition, you could liberally coat the flutes inside of the cap with silicone or sticks-like-shit or gutter sealant to make it more secure and make it air-tight. It's not as though it's going to be subject to movement or stresses and strains, tucked away behind that panel.
--

Chris

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, but the cap is very shallow, so the clip would be over the part of the pipe that slopes inward - I think it might just pop off when the clip was tightened.

That might work.
-- Richard
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I would just stuff a scrunched up plastic bag into the pipe. It not like you’re trying to block mass air flow. Alternatively, it wouldn’t be that hard to molish up a wooden plug that matched the internal diameter of the pipe. Add a gloop of whatever sealant you have to hand if you want to make it more airtight.
Tim
--
Please don't feed the trolls

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Reasonable quality plastic bag and a cable tie would do it just as well.
GH
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 26 May 2019 16:45:02 +0100 (GMT+01:00), "Jim K.."

You were actually correct initially. Newspaper followed by foam and slice the top flush, or leave a "mushroom".
Standard practice in construction sites I attend, it is often used for cable ducts.
Needs a tool to remove it if the pipes re-used, but if not it may be considered permanent. Vermin dont seem to like the foam and although it discolours it is very stable.
AB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 26/05/2019 15:38, Archibald Tarquin Blenkinsopp Esq wrote:

I was lifting some floorboards last weekend. I found lots of mouse bite sized bits of foam. I've also had squirrel sized ones - although the squirrel gave up when it got to the wire netting. And found another way into the loft :(
Andy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Nope, plastic bags don’t last long.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 27 May 2019 04:01:06 +1000, "Rod Speed"

One does try. I often put my pennorth in, but you can guarantee a few IQ zeros will pop up with something implausable anyway.
One would have to have led a very sheltered life to suggest the plastic bag approach. I do wonder what peoples motives are when they provide such "advice".
AB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

'Plastic bags' come in all sorts of qualities.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Never seen any that last very long at all even when kept in a drawer inside the house.
Some plastic sheet lasts fine, most obviously with the thick stuff used under a concrete slab on the ground when its left lying around inside a house and even cheap ground sheets do last a long time inside the house. I have a couple used as curtains that have lasted 45 years.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I don't believe that there is any motive, just ignorance.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I said reasonable quality, something like is used for for storing food in a freezer not the wrapper from a loaf of Mother Pride. In the position behind the bath away from UV light it will last decades. People store things in plastic bags in lofts and drawers for years without problems. It was only odours the OP wanted to stop emitting from the pipe not gas or liquid under pressure.
GH
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Bullshit. I found some of those that had got down the back of a drawer and was surprised to find that they break up into lots of very small pieces of plastic at the merest touch.

And plenty find those fall to bits too.

Sure.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

As your expertise in bags only encompasses wet paper ones then it can be taken that your selection of ones made from other materials is bound to be less than satisfactory.
God knows what state of squalor and infestation you live in if any type of plastic bag has time to degrade down the back of a drawer, don’t you ever clean up .
GH
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

<reams of your shit any 2 year old could leave for dead flushed where it belongs>
Whoops, nothing left. Wota surprise.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Don’t see why not with that big jubilee clip.

That would be worse than the cap.
A big rubber bung might well work.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You can buy a rubber plug with the same sort of multiple circumferential flaps as toilet adaptors (but male) from builders' or plumbers' merchants. Or Ebay. Neatest but not cheapest solution and easier to fit than the external cap. Might have to clean and trim it a bit.
--

Roger Hayter

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 26/05/2019 13:23, Richard Tobin wrote:

If it was cut back to the wall, would it be rounder?
If so, can you find a 68mm to 40mm (or 32mm) reducer of the type that that is flexible rubber, with ridges around and that pushes into the pipe? And then blank the reduced size hole - you can get internal blanks of that size no problem.
SteveW
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, assuming I was able to cut it neatly, which I doubt. I'm not sure what it's made of - it's connected to a cast iron downpipe, and may well date from the 19th century.
-- Richard
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.