bicarbonate of soda / soda crystals

In article , Dot Net Developer writes:
"bicarbonate of soda" is Sodium Hydroden Carbonate. "soda crystals" are Sodium Carbonate, IIRC. "caustic soda" is Sodium Hydroxide.
Every few decades, chemists decide to change the way they name compounds, so I might not be using the names taught in chemistry lessons today. (Do they even have chemistry lessons today?)
Reply to
Andrew Gabriel
used for raising cakes & some bread, but is not baking powder
washing soda, a degreaser
very strong degreaser for unblocking drains and dissolving human remains.
Probably now questions like 'how do you feel about the politics of chemical E101'
NT
Reply to
meow2222
Can it also be used as a general purpose cleaner (diluted in water)?
Can I use this (diluted) for - cleaning inside fridge & on the sofa? (Previously I used bicarbonate of soda.)
Thanks, regards, Robert
Reply to
Dot Net Developer
In article , Dot Net Developer writes:
Baking powder is Sodium Hydroden Carbonate diluted with flour so that the tiny amounts required can be reasonably accurately measured in a kitchen. In commercial cooking, it's used raw without dilution as more accurate measuring is used. It slowly neutralises acids from the other ingredients, reacting to produce CO2 responsible for raising. Bread is normally raised by yeast and sugar liberating CO2, but soda bread is an example where Sodium Hydroden Carbonate reacting with milk is used instead.
Yes. Particularly useful where you don't want any smell from a perfumed cleaner, such as inside a fridge, and you don't want any acid or alkali left behind. Sodium Hydroden Carbonate is good for neutralising acids and alkalis. Another traditional use in this area is for neutralising excess stomach acid.
Not sure. Why risk it -- sodium bicarbonate is so cheap?
Reply to
Andrew Gabriel
(diluted in water)?
The penny's just dropped as to why I can't find bicarbonate of soda in the supermarket - I've been looking in the cleaning products isle - I need to go to the home baking products isle!
Reply to
Dot Net Developer
In article , "The Medway Handyman" writes:
You're responding out of context, because previous poster snipped an important line.
Reply to
Andrew Gabriel
On 06 Oct 2007 15:50:56 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew
Baking powder is usually a mixture of Bicarbonate of Soda and Tartaric Acid in the ratio 1:2.
Bicarbonate of Soda can, baking powder cannot.
Other than in fridges Bicarbonate of Soda isn't a terribly good cleaning agent and (if bought in small tubs from a supermarket) quite an expensive one.
I wouldn't use bicarbonate of soda on materials. Washing Soda is a fairly good general purpose cleaning agent but not for use in situ on fabrics.
Reply to
Peter Parry
No, I was referring to sodium hydroxide, my snipping was poor.
It went:
Me: and making soap.
Reply to
Grunff
(various snips)
Please explain. I've tried this (diluted in hot water, rubbed on with tea towel on to sofa) with good surprisingly good results. I'll try something else if there's either a problem with this, or a better way. Thanks.
Reply to
Dot Net Developer
It's very good for removing burnt-on-stuff from saucepans. Leave a paste of bicarb and water on for a few hours and bingo!
Ian
Reply to
The Real Doctor
Bicarb isn't very soluble in water, and is quite abrasive as a powder, so I guess you might be slightly abrading your fabric. A carpet cleaner might be more suitable as not all stains and dirt respond to alkalis
Reply to
Stuart Noble
Not general purpose but very good for removing tannin from teapots and cups. Mix to a paste with a little water.
Reply to
djc

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