Best way to shorten internal door?

Hi guys,
I got new carpets fitted. As a result I need to shorten two internal
doors by *about* 1cm.
What is the best way to do this? I have a DIY book (don't we all?)
that recommends using a manual plane.
I am a complete novice at carpentry - should I be trying this? What
tools should I be using? Etc etc
Cheers
Lawrence
Reply to
Lord0
Lawrence,
Simply a hand saw, plane, craft knife and glasspaper.
The method that I would use is simply to mark the bottom of the door with a pencil on both sides and then to avoid any spalling - score along both marks with a sharp craft knife.
Once that is done, use the saw to cut just inside the line and holding the saw at a fairly 'flat' angle to reduce spalling - remember to take care when approaching the end of the cut to hold the waste and saw slowly. This is best done using a new 'throw away' crosscut saw from one of the 'sheds' for the reason stated under Warning below.
Once the waste is removed, clean up to and just 'take out' the scored line with the plane and use fine glasspaper rubbed along the cut edges to take the arris off - voila job done and rehang the door.
Warning:If they are flush doors, you have a good chance of hitting a couple of staples holding the frame together on both edges of the door - if you 'hit' these then they will certainly blunt the saw/plane and will require removal before you can proceed further. If you do hit these, there are several different methods to remove them using a thin bladed, flat screwdriver and a pair of pincers or simply cut through them with a hacksaw blade.
Brian G
Reply to
Brian G
In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
Another thing to be aware of is that internal doors are usually hollow. Taking 10mm off shouldn't be a problem unless the door has *already* been shortened on an earlier occasion, but taking much more off is likely to result in losing the bottom piece of framing altogether. If that happens, you need to get another piece of wood of the right thickness, and glue it between the two hardboard (or whatever) skins - clamping it together until the glue has set.
Reply to
Roger Mills
Almost guaranteed at the very least to cause some damage to the doors and at worse to remove the fingers of the admitted "complete novice".
Brian G
Reply to
Brian G
If you don't want to remove then rehang the door, one of these can do a good job:
formatting link
saw is easy to use and gives a fine smooth finish, no need to plane afterwards. It's very easy to use and provided you draw a pencil line along the door to cut along it's easy to cut a straight line.
Reply to
Steve Firth
"Steve Firth" wrote in message
Hmmm! I doubt it...more of an f**kin,£$"*&% thing scenario. :-)
Reply to
George
I've had no problems cutting doors absolutely straight with one of these saws. Have you ever tried to use one? The blade is so wide that it really can't wander off the cut. Of course starting the cut and ensuring that it is going to go where you want it is a tad tricky but anyone who can use a handsaw should be able to use one of these.
Reply to
Steve Firth
It's a piece of cake with a pull saw, and I've removed as little as 4mm using one.
Again, have you actually tried to do it yourself or are you one of those armchair experts?
Reply to
Steve Firth
I think I'd take door off, lay it on table or two saw horses. Put a fine tooth blade in the old circular saw. Measure carefully using the distance the saw blade is offset Then clamp a batten as a guide across the door use that to guide edge of saw. One cm. is narrow strip but anyone handy should be able to do it neatly. And it is the bottom of the door anyway! Not at eye level. If that is not within capability then suggest get a reasonably competent 'carpenter type' person to do it. Many doors are hollow but there should be several centimetres of would on the bottom edge
Reply to
terry
I haven't used one of these on a door but I did to trim the bottom off door facings so that tile effect laminate(spit) would fit underneath and can't praise it highly enough. You have to use one to appreciate how good at tool it is.
Archie
Reply to
Archie
I've used one to take a few mm off a door that was sticking on the leading edge over newly laid laminate. I agree, they are excellent to use.
Reply to
The Medway Handyman
And if you're a millimetre out, you can take a bit more off in a few seconds, which would not be possible with a handsaw. I'd sooner take the door off than be on my hands and knees with a handsaw
Reply to
Stuart Noble
Yup. I was a bit worried about rehanging it the first time I did it - but it went back exactly the same way it came off. Quite surprised how small the screws holding the hinges on were!
Ben
Reply to
Ben Blaukopf
Stuart,
None if you are skilled at using such machinery - like myself, a time served 'chippie' of over 40 years who's handled virtually every type of portable power tool for cutting wood and fitted more doors and frames than I can remember - or the *well versed* D-I-Y'er.
But if you are a novice and unsure of what to do - and the OP is that, then it's a far better way to cut a door for the first time using hand tools - there's less chance of taking too much off, less chance of the 'electric' saw tilting or jamming through incorrect use - and more importantly more chance of keeping all the fingers on his hands - or the saw 'jumping' and taking a lump out of his thigh....
Personally, I wouldn't use any power tools to fit a simple internal door, whether panelled or flush, hardwood or softwood - especially in my own house - I find it quicker, easier and more accurate to use sharp handtools and a bit of patience in taking off leading edges to get that old fashione 'penny' joint all around the door - even on a 'bent' door frame. Some thing you cannot do with an electric saw or planer - mind you, a battery powered drill comes in useful for drilling out the lock/latch holes on the very odd occassions when the old hands are too sore to turn the damned bit and brace :-)
Brian G
Reply to
Brian G

Site Timeline Threads

  • Soooooo since no one is mentioning building something I'll mention the POS I...
  • site's last updated in

    Woodworking

HomeOwnersHub website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.