Beeswax ?

I have been watching "How Clean Is Your House". In the programme they melted in the microwave some Beeswax to polish some old furniture. It can be heated over a pan of hot water too they said.
I ordered some from eBay and have a problem.
When I do that and leave it to go cool it goes rock hard. What do I need to add to it to make sure the beeswax stays soft so I can use it. I am sure they added some kind of oil to it?? Maybe wrong but they said it was the best way to polish old furniture.
Thanks Sam
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Samantha Booth wrote:

My Dad used turpentine, mixed in after removing the beeswax from the heat.
Sheila
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S Viemeister wrote:

Yup. Isnt it cheaper to buy ready mixed beeswax polish now though?
NT
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snipped-for-privacy@care2.com wrote:

Absolutely. That programme makes me laugh. Cleaning things with vinegar & baking soda FFS. They have absolutely no bloody idea about cleaning, they have just jumped on the green, natural is best bollox bandwagon. They need to pop down to Tesco & buy some decent products.
Modern polishes, hard surface cleaners & detergent sanitizers leave any of these old wives tale cleaners in the dust. Vinegar & baking soda clean bugger all.
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman
www.medwayhandyman.co.uk
  Click to see the full signature.
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The Medway Handyman coughed up some electrons that declared:

When you don't have any "Silver Dip" to hand, ali foil, boiling water, salt and baking soda do work a treat on silver (plated) items.
Cheers
Tim
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On Wed, 21 Jan 2009 00:21:38 +0000, Tim S wrote:

On a more practical note. If you don't have any silver dip handy, don't try to polish your silverware. Do something else instead - another day of tarnished silver won't kill you.
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They're also highly damaging long-term. This electro-polishing hack is an abomination.
Silver Dip (thiourea inhibited with citric acid) has the great advantage of not being damaging to silver, even when you're cleaning considerable sulphide tarnish off it. OTOH, it's toxic. Sainsburys sell it, but not Tesco.
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Andy Dingley coughed up some electrons that declared:

Most interesting - one for the archive :)
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Ali foil, water and a drop of fairy liquid works well, no need for the rest.
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wrote:

I disagree. I have cleaned lots of things with Vinegar and baking powder. Does the tops of my cupboards much better than any supermarket rubbish. I think the old fashioned methods are absolutely great and will always chose to use them before any Tesco products.
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On Wed, 21 Jan 2009 00:05:52 GMT, "The Medway Handyman"

....yet these ingredients are commonly used in "Modern polishes, hard surface cleaners & detergent sanitizers"
Almost all modern household cleaning products are pure spin and contain nothing new or improved. In many cases using products now banned by COSHH and other namby pamby legislation produce better results.
Even beeswax isn't what it used to be.
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wrote:

Well, I'm as sceptical as you regarding most of the advice, but after 10 years of trying to get rid of an embarassing encrustation in the upstairs loo with all kinds of commercial products (including the black Harpic varient which claims to include HCL ) to no avail, I bunged 500ml of distilled vinegar down it & it worked a treat after 24 hours (I'd left some of the other stuff for days). All that was left was some sediment which flushed away. I was on the verge of replacing the bowl.
Bramble-stick
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Bramble-Stick wrote:

I think the truth is probably somewhere in the middle. Branded products are often just over-priced basic chemicals but it's easier to find a kettle descaler than phosphoric acid, and small amounts of anything are always expensive. Keeping some basic chemicals around the house is useful, whatever your philosophy: Strong alkali, caustic soda (although washing soda is adequate for most jobs). Strong acid, sulphamic (comes in crystals, safe to handle, but still ph1) Solvents, white spirit, meths, isopropanol. I exclude hydrochloric acid and ammonia, both of which blow your head off with the fumes before you've actually used them for anything, and don't do anything the above can't. I'm going to duck now before someone tells me brick acid is a must-have, and I must admit that I've never tried sulphamic on cement stained brickwork.
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Except when they're _cheaper_. Domestic cleaners are sold in convenient quantities, at a price that's affordable (maybe excessive, but not ridiculous or it won't sell) and are in purities adequate for the task.
Industrial chemicals are often expensive (you're not usually spending your own money), sold by outfits that scorn retail, come in quantities that need a truck to deliver and may be of exceptional purity that you don't need, but do pay for. Don't rule out "Mr Muscle" kitchen cleaner, as you can't do much that's better, cheaper or more convenient, even in a lab.
Best of all though tends to be farmers' shops. Bulk, simple chemicals, reasonable purity and price, and a quantity that's a useful size. Best place you'll find for NaOH, conc. H2SO4 etc.
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Stuart Noble wrote:

Rubbish.
Nothing beats ammonia for wood bending either..

Brick acid is simply a cheap way to get a pretty strong acid.
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You can't bend wood with ammonia in any concentration that's vaguely safe to handle. You're not going to achieve much with .880, you would (commercially) be looking at anhydrous and that's hard to work with.
I'd agree with your general point though - I use 26% ammonia for fuming oak to darken it (another reason why it's not a good idea for much bending) and even though ammonia is one of the few common chemicals I'm at all sensitive to, a full-face mask (Avon S10) is all I ever need to work with it.

Define "strong" though, as that's a little more subtle for acids than mere concentration. I use at least five workshop acids commonly (sulphuric, hydrochloric, sulphamic, phosphoric, acetic) and two rarely (nitric, chromic) and you have to choose according to task, not just pick the most concentrated.
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Andy Dingley wrote:

all of those work on limescale..you pick the one that attacks everything attached to it the least ;-)
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Samantha Booth coughed up some electrons that declared:

The stuff I got was a blend of beeswax and canauba wax which seems to work quite well from the tin (being sold as furniture polish). Given the pungent odour, I suspect it has some solvent in it as well to keep it soft. It certainly goes on as a paste, and then becomes harder and harder as it's polished, which suggests to me a solvent is evaporating off.
It sounds like Sheila's turps suggestion might be on the money.
Cheers
Tim
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On Tue, 20 Jan 2009 23:44:40 +0000

Carnuba wax is even harder tha beeswax when the solvents have gone. Don't get taken in by all this 'feeding the wood' crap, what a wax does is to seal the pores so that the wood doesn't dry out. Despite being hard it still wears away.
The best commercial waxes that I know are Liberon's Black Bison range. I use a lot of this in my workshop. The one you'd want is the 'natural'. The smell of the solvent goes in four or five days, some love it, some hate it.
R.
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Brilliant thanks. Sounds like that's the one. Will give it a whirl. I don't know if its cheaper to buy it ready done never thought of that. Just liked the idea of using a raw beeswax and doing it myself really. What company do ready made stuff?
Thanks again you peeps xxx
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