Bathroon and Tumble-dryer ventilation

Recent renovations have left me with a slight dilemma!
I have a floor to ceiling cupboard in my new kitchen which will house a tumble-dryer, atop the washing machine. Behind this (on the other side of a stud wall) I have installed a downstairs shower/wc/basin room. Above the 'cupboard' (in the ceiling cavity) I have already installed a 4" flexible vent-hose which passes through a 9" wall and goes up through the garage roof to a roof vent, complete with mushroom cap!
What I need to do is vent the bathroom (via an extractor fan) and join the vent from the tumble-dryer onto the same trunking/ductwork but I'm concerned that the duct from the dryer should have some form of non-return valve built into it, either in the trunking, hose, branch connector or even as part of the bathroom extractor.... wherever really!
Is anyone aware of a product on the market that will allow me to do this in whatever method that can be adopted from the description above?
Any one tackled two appliances to one vent like this before?
Thanks for any pointers,
rgds
dean.
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I haven`t, but maybe if you could angle the vents towards the fan in some way, when the fan is operational I would have thought the moist air would be drawn towards the fan by negative pressure, ie.
b'room vent \ \_______/ / \_ __fan_/ / / dryer
The dryer will be trying to force air out, and with the bathroom being at a static pressure and the fan creating a negative pressure, i`m guessing it would go that way first :-}
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A condensing dryer and use the trunking only for ventilation?
Christian.
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You _can buy 4-inch diameter plastic non-return valves which might help you here. I got one from Focus for a similar application. Although when I recently needed another one, I found that my local Focus has just been re-branded into a Wickes-Extra (??? extra what exactly?), which turned out to be just as wanky as the Focusisation of my local Wickes was.... How confusing!
Nick.
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Electrical Appliances are not allowed in any room containing a fixed bath or shower.
Peter
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you can get flap valves that fit inline in the ducting to stop back drafts of air, that would probably do the job.
Have a look in catalogues/websites of Vent-axia etc.
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Chris French, Leeds

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