"20 weight" oil needed for rowing machine chain?

The manual for my rowing machine tells me I need to lubricate the chain every 600 miles with "20 weight" oil. I've never heard this term before but Google tells me (not surprisingly) it's a grading relating to viscosity.
I've got two containers of oil in the garage - one's a can of motor oil, rated 10W40 (for which the "W" refers to "Winter" not "Weight") and the other is a small can of thin oil branded "Woolworths", bicycles and sewing machines for the lubrication of. Neither label has any indication as to the content's "weight".
Experience suggests to me that my Woolie's can will do the trick, but can anyone shed any light on this?
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David

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Use whatever you have most of.
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Just don't get it on any kind of friction pads that may be in use. Is it not about time that exercise machines replaced friction pads with a device for generating power charge you phone or some such? Brian
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Brian Gaff wrote:

Quite a few exercise machines don't use friction pads, but have a magnet which is moved closer/further from a rotating iron flywheel, generating resistance by the eddy currents.
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+1
I would use whatever was least messy. A chain is cheap and easy to replace too. Not worth agonising over the "right" lubricant.
Tim
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On 24/09/2016 22:37, Lobster wrote:

At a guess as I worked for rolls royce oiling machines for a couple of years around 40 years ago. We used various oils for different machines. They (from memory) used a numbering system from 10 (very thin) up to 80 (very thick) and the 10 was very light, I recall guys asking for a 30 to use in their cars so I reckon you are looking for something below that so I reckon the Woolie one is about right.
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On Saturday, 24 September 2016 22:37:47 UTC+1, Lobster wrote:

20 is a thick oil, the light stuff won't be at all suitable.
Your multigrade car oil will be 40 when cold, 10 when hot, so that's not right either. Presumably it uses thick oil so it doesn't drop off the chain.
NT
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On Sat, 24 Sep 2016 16:25:19 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I know some motorcycle chain lubes are very sticky so as you say, they don't get thrown off and I thought some cycle chain lubes were 'dry' (waxy?) so that the didn't attract dust and dirt (turning the oil into a grinding paste), not that that should be an issue in the OP's case. ;-)
So, I would say, if the chain is covered and you are looking for 'exercise' [1], a bit of extra drag from some motorcycle chain lube might be worth it, should also be offering better protection against wear (the main idea after all) and not end up all over the place.
I'm also guessing this wouldn't be an 'o-ring' chain so it might benefit for a good cleaning before a good re-lubing. If you can get it off easily (joining link?) soak / wash it in some suitable de-greaser (that would have been petrol in 'my day' <g>), allow to dry and then I'd put it in my tin of 'Linklife' on the stove. ;-)
I think this is the nearest current equivalent that I have found:
http://www.trialsbits.co.uk/product_info.php?cPath 3&products_id06
And remember there are two main areas you are trying to lubricate, the pins, rollers and side plates of the chain itself and the sprocket teeth where the chain is joining (under load).
Cheers, T i m
1] We generally fit heavier / puncture resistant tyres on our cycles and tandem because we are looking to use them partly for (fun / interesting) exercise and partly because we want that exercise to be from cycling, not repairing punctures or pushing the bikes home. ;-)
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Ah, that takes me back 30 years! My mum really used to love it when I boiled up my motorbike chain on her cooker. (Hey, I never did actually spill it though, mum...!). Actually, I've very recently come back to motorbikes again after a long layoff, and it seems that method is now out of favour (I suppose probably because you don't get many non-O-ring chains these days). Anyway, I don't think it would be appropriate for my rowing machine, which has a very lightweight chain in comparison to a motorbike (and it's not done 'de rigeur' for bicycle chains either), and it could be awful messy in my spare bedroom!
As there seemed to be a lot of disagreement here, I've done some more digging. Seems that 20-weight oil is what's usually used inside motorcycle forks or shock absorbers (eg http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/282042649506 ). As it's 30+ years since I last played with that stuff I can't remember what it was like (though I expect Mum still has half a can in her garage somewhere!); however I had a look on the website of the rowing machine manufacturer and found a how-to-do-it maintenance video. This has a bloke using 3-in-1 (ie, the same as my Woolie's oil as far as I'm concerned!) See http://tinyurl.com/j9w2smr (2 mins 5 secs in) or http://www.concept2.co.uk/service/indoor-rowers/model-d/maintenance . That'll do me.
Thanks all
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On Sun, 25 Sep 2016 12:00:34 +0000 (UTC), Lobster

;-)

It's not here, on my basic bikes (and I still have my tin of Linklife <g>) and all my bigger bikes are shaft drive anyway. ;-) >Anyway, I don't think it would be appropriate for

Quite.

Ah, now that's more like a jewellery 'chain' than anything typically transmission orientated <g> so yes, all you would need is for it to be given a light oiling to ensure oil gets inside the rollers and a very light surface coating to prevent rust.
In this case it's not necessarily what's bet for the chain but what is the best compromise for a chain being used in that environment (more like a tension / recoil starter cord than a chain as such.
Our Tunturi exercise cycle uses an enclosed toothed belt that is both maintenance free and silent and you can get them quite fine and endless so I'm surprised they aren't used for things like your rowing machine?
Looking at the parts diagram it seems the chain is retracted by a compound pulley system and some shock cord. It would be easier with a tooth belt as they can be 'coiled up' around a tension pulley etc.
Have you tried one of the water rowers (and I don't mean 'a boat'). ;-)?
Cheers, T i m
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On Sunday, 25 September 2016 13:00:46 UTC+1, Lobster wrote:

All that you need for oiling a bike is a strip drawn along the top of the c hain to where you are put off by the rear fork. If you do this before a war m up and then get off and run the chain through a rag, all the excess will come off.
The gentle warm up will have run the oil into where it is needed and should be adequate for 500 miles of regular use. I doubt anyone rows for miles at any one time, possibly half an hour -which would take you a couple of mile s down hill on a real river, half a mile back up.
You are not going to stress any moving parts at that rate for some consider able time.
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On Sunday, 25 September 2016 18:34:07 UTC+1, Weatherlawyer wrote:

ld be adequate for 500 miles of regular use. I doubt anyone rows for miles at any one time, possibly half an hour -which would take you a couple of mi les down hill on a real river, half a mile back up.
Rowing's a good bit faster than that. Unless you're a kid not paying attent ion and paddling Donald Duck.
NT
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On Sunday, 25 September 2016 22:31:55 UTC+1, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

ould be adequate for 500 miles of regular use. I doubt anyone rows for mile s at any one time, possibly half an hour -which would take you a couple of miles down hill on a real river, half a mile back up.

ntion and paddling Donald Duck.
So how fast is rowing?
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On 26/09/16 06:30, Weatherlawyer wrote:

WEll if you look at the boats following the varsity thames race, most of them are on the step and planing, so its gotta be around 10mph or more
I reckon a skiff well rowed by a fit person is easily 5-6mph.
But a dinghy is probably only walking pace.
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On Monday, 26 September 2016 07:23:02 UTC+1, The Natural Philosopher wrote :

should be adequate for 500 miles of regular use. I doubt anyone rows for mi les at any one time, possibly half an hour -which would take you a couple o f miles down hill on a real river, half a mile back up.

ttention and paddling Donald Duck.

I don't know exact figures, but no way did I only do 4mph, probably nearer 12.
NT
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On 26/09/16 09:38, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

In what boat?
I can believe that for a racing skiff, but not a fishing skiff or a dinghy.

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On Monday, 26 September 2016 10:54:52 UTC+1, The Natural Philosopher wrote :

rote:

d should be adequate for 500 miles of regular use. I doubt anyone rows for miles at any one time, possibly half an hour -which would take you a couple of miles down hill on a real river, half a mile back up.

attention and paddling Donald Duck.

of

rer 12.

Pencil scull. For anyone not familiar, they're very narrow and completely u nstable. But fast.

y.
No :)
NT
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On Sun, 25 Sep 2016 22:30:26 -0700 (PDT), Weatherlawyer

It very much depends on the boat, conditions and the fitness of the rower.
I'd say most people could row a 'std' rowing dinghy at about walking pace, given no 'tide' or wind.
When rowing our 3m folding dinghy the other day we were 3 up and a dog and *I* was probably doing better than walking speed but my Mrs and daughter were slower. I've since got some longer oars so could probably go faster on my own. Our 16' GRP Thames skiff is a real delight to row and with me rowing (3 up) was able to out-row 4 'blokes' in a similar size and shape boat (for obvious reasons known to me but not them). ;-)
I think the fastest rowing boat are the 8's and they are around 20 mph?
I'm not aware of any non-displacement rowing boat (but there probably are some).
Cheers, T i m
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http://windwaterearthmind.blogspot.co.uk/2013/01/sculling-hydrofoil-1975-and-2012-as.html
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On 26 Sep 2016 15:55:15 +0100 (BST), Alan Braggins

I thought someone might have tried it! ;-)
Cheers, T i m
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