12V Power Adapter Question

Hi, I'm looking to replace a damaged 12V 1A DC power adapter for a piece of computer equipment. I have one similar with correct plugs etc but its 12V 1.5A DC (came from another piece of equipment). Is this safe to use as a replacement - i.e the current output of new one is higher than old one, does this matter? thanks.
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does
This will do fine,the item you're using it on will only draw the current it needs.
Do make sure the terminal plug has the same polarity as the duff one.
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On 25/02/2008 11:26, Brian wrote:

The 1.5A is the maximum it can provide, the equipment will only draw what it actually needs, is the polarity of the connector correct? was the original regulated or unregulated? ditto the replacement?
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thank you both for your help.
How do I check the polarity of the connector and whether its regulated or unregulated. Both are black power-brick type adapters. Original was from a Belkin switch and my proposed replacement is from a network camera, so they are for similar products.
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Have a look on the power supply it should show the input and output ie 240v in 12v out and a little sign indicating a line and another line with a semi circle&line informing you of its polarity +&-
Most power supplys are regulated nowadays so dont worry too much because if its not stated on the outside of the supply you will need a meter or opening the PS to detect what it is.
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In uk.d-i-y, Brian wrote:

For polarity look at the label on the adapter, which normally has a small diagram showing the inner connector (+) and the outer connector (-), or (rarely IME) the other way round. If the adapters aren't labelled, the boxes you plug them into surely will be. Almost all adapters are regulated these days.
Have you checked (with the power off, of course) that the plug actually fits? Lots of them look the same size but aren't. Just a fraction of a mm is enough to cause problems, the plug either won't go in or goes in but loosely.
--
Mike Barnes

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In an earlier contribution to this discussion,

I assume they both have similar cylindrical output connectors? There's usually a diagram on the body of the supply showing whether the inside is +ve and the outside -ve, or vice versa. Otherwise, you need a DC voltmeter.
I'm sure I've read somewhere that devices requiring a regulated power supply have a fatter central pin in their connector, and the power supply plug, a larger hole - preventing an unregulated supply from being used. I'm not sure whether that's universal.
An unregulated supply will have an open circuit voltage considerably above the nominal output voltage, and will relay on the load of the powered device to bring the voltage down. If used with something which only draws a very low current, some damage could occur.
--
Cheers,
Roger
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Roger Mills wrote:

Unfortunately there's no standard for these jacks, and its too late to retroactively introduce any now.
To the OP, a multimeter will answer both points in a few seconds.
NT
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Brian formulated the question :

Make sure the polarity of the two plugs are the same plus check both are regulated and there should not be a problem. Regulated means the output is regulated at a fairly accurate 12v within a wide load range. It might say 'regulated' on the case - if not you can check it with a volt meter, no load output should be quite close to 12v.
--
Regards,
Harry (M1BYT) (L)
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It *might* matter if the normal average load on the original is low and regulated, and the more powerful one unregulated. For example a printer might have a very low power consumption when not actually printing and a large unregulated supply might produce a high enough voltage to damage it. But it's not that likely. If the larger one is regulated you should be ok.
--
*El nino made me do it

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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