What can I use to pump out my gas tank


The gas tank on my chevy has water in the gas. The seal around the sending unit got put in wrong when I changed the fuel pump. I have to dump all the gas/water in the tank and do not want to remove the tank. I took off the fuel filter and pumped out a gallon of gas, and found out half of it was water.
I can remove the fuel pump and sending unit from the access panel. Before I remove it, I plan to pump out as much of the contents as I can into a gas can. (A local auto service center said they will take the bad gas for recycling). But I know the fuel pump does not go to the bottom of the tank, so I will need another method to remove the rest of the gas/water.
I know to NOT use a shop vac or anything else that has a motor with brushes which spark. But what can I use? I was thinking about these electric drill operated pumps as long as the drill is kept far enough away from the gas tank using long hoses. But maybe there is a better method. Anyone have any ideas? I suppose the last option is to use a sponge and elbow grease.
Tj
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snipped-for-privacy@sumplace.com wrote:

You ought to be able to siphon most of it out. Then what I do for lawnmower gas tanks with water in the bottom is put a hose (like a two foot piece of gas line hose) in it and then blow across the top of the hose with compressed air from the air compressor which makes it an aspirator and it will suck the water out of the bottom and gas. Do this outdoors and no smoking or open flames and I wouldn't let it spray on the grass or the neighbor's rose bushes! When you get it all back together a tank of gasohol or adding some alcohol ought to remove what water remains. And for the old gas in the tank, I'd let it sit for a while and pour the gasoline off the top and put it back in the vehicle.
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The seal around the

Most tanks today have anti-siphon barriers of some sort. How long did it take to pump that gallon out? It may be just as easy to pump some that way. Since water settles to the bottom, you may have most of it already.
If the car runnable at all? If so, dump in some alcohol and it will mix with the water left in there and clear the tank.
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In NYS, most gasoline has 10% alcohol, due to regulations.
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Christopher A. Young
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At an auto parts store, I found a cheap bulb & tube type siphon whose packaging claimed it wouldn't be destroyed by gas. To my surprise, it was true. Now that I think about it, I might've gotten it from a marine supply place - this goes back years. The tube's not much thicker than a pencil, so it should get past barriers, if any.
When I'm done with it, I let it dry outdoors for a day and then store it in a ziplok bag so it doesn't get all full of cobwebs, dust, etc. Mine's actually used to transfer fuel from my boat tank to the mower's gas jug, so I want the gas to remain clean.
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On Jun 29, 3:45am, snipped-for-privacy@sumplace.com wrote:

Your tank might have an anti siphon metal piece and make siphoning impossible. Does it run at all and just run poorly? Alcohol absorbes something like 1% water without increasing alcohols volume, thats what gas line antifreeze is, alcohol. For old cars with old gas that have been sitting and wont run right I dump in a gallon of alcohol and then can burn out the gas, add about 15% alcohol to the gas, you can buy a gallon of denatured alcohol for about 12$ then the water will burn out. Then add more gas and more alcohol and it will all burn out. Ive been adding alcohol to gas way before the 10% gasohol became standard. In Europe I had a 67 TBird and the gas was so bad and the car wouldnt run right until I poured in nearly 1 gallon of alcohol, so it works on bad bottom of storage tank gas as well and wont hurt anything. In winter I always have a gallon of denatured on hand for windshield washer fluid and gasolene water absorbtion. If you buy "Heat" by the little yellow bottle, which is just Alcohol a gallon would cost you about 40$, by the gallon is cheap, and "Heat`s" purpose is stated as just water removal. Alcohol is my friend and has kept me happy and saved me alot of money from car repairs
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disconnect fuel line at engine attach a hose, pump gas into a container by turning on ignition key, no siphoning needed.
the pump will empty mostly the tank.
then if you want use something to dry the remaing gasoline in tank and pup it out some more.
this avoids pulling tank
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That's a bad idea as on many cars running the fuel system dry is a problem.
He should be able to siphon it. I keep a piece of "sort of hard" black plastic 1/4" line for that. It was left over hydralic line from a boat project. I prefer it over soft line as it it easier to force through bends. Soft line just bunches up if it hits a difficult turn or a flap.
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running it dry for one time with zero pressure shouldnt be a problem and besides most vehicles have ant siphon decices built into the filler neck
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I'm guessing you don't work on many modern fuel injection cars.
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Quicker than pumping it is to use an air hose into the filler neck and pack it with rags...
Hmmm...would gas go through the fuel pump without the pump being activated?
Harry K
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Nobody knows how much water is in it, water is in air and condenses into all gas in tanks and gets burnt, some water is in all gas purchased mainly from storage at stations. If it runs now alcohol will fix it before any damage occurs, he doesnt even say if it runs or how poorly, and maybe it runs fine and its all his panic, and maybe no real amount ever got in. My gas comes with 10% alcohol, a bit of water getting in it is just absorbed and burnt every day as I drive. Did you ever notice the Vapor comming out a cold motor at -10f, guess what, its water.
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On Tue, 29 Jun 2010 07:56:15 -0700 (PDT), ransley

But it's not from water in the fuel. For every gallon of fuel burned, very close to a gallon of water is PRODUCED. Large amounts of water in the fuel should NOT be absorbed with alcohol. As much water as possible should be drawn off the borttom of the tank. If the fuel pump assembly can be removed with the tank installed, remove it and siphon the water from the bottom of the tamk till you get mostly gasoline - THEN add alcohol, replace the damaged gasket and re-install the pump/guage assembly, refill the tank with clean dry gas, and run. A bit of ATF or MMO to protect/lubricate the injectors isn't a bad idea either (a couple ounces to a full tank)
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On Jun 29, 12:41pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

"For every gallon of fuel burned close to a gallon of water is produced" I think you have just rewritten chemistry and solved the worlds water problems, If the car runs adding alcohol is the easiest and safest way to remove it, ive done it for 50 years and never wasted a dime draining a tank or hurt anything
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On Tue, 29 Jun 2010 14:27:03 -0700 (PDT), ransley

The only products of complete combustion of a hydrocarbon are H2O and CO2.
Gasoline is a mixture of many hydrocarbons; for the purposes of this discussion I will estimate that it consists of isooctane, which has the composition C8H18. Each molecule of isooctane that burns completely produces 8 molecules of CO2 and 9 molecules of H2O.
All that we need to know is the volume of one mole (a standard number of molecules) of liquid isooctane, and the volume of the combustion products resulting from the isooctane. One mole of isooctane has a volume of 165 mL, or 0.165 liters. As a pretty good approximation, a mole of any gas at room temperature and atmospheric pressure occupies 24.4 liters.
So, if you assume that all of the combustion products will be in vapor form, this amounts to 17 moles of gas, or 381 liters. If you assume that the CO2 is in vapor form and the water is liquid, that's 8 moles of gas at 180 liters, plus 9 moles of liquid water at 18 mL/mole, or 0.16 liters.
Of course, there ARE other products - because gasoline is not pure isoctane, and air is not pure oxygen - but the other products of combustion are insignificant in volume compared to the CO2 and the H2O.
That's very "close" to the same amount of water "produced" as fuel burned in my books.
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On Jun 29, 6:37pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

You know more about gasolene than I will ever know, but are you saying 1 gallon of gasolene produces 1 gallon of water, by weight, as by product.
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On Wed, 30 Jun 2010 06:29:56 -0700 (PDT), ransley

By volume, if all vapour is condensed, 1 gallon of gasoline, when burned, produces 0.96 gallons of water, more or less.
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On Tue, 29 Jun 2010 07:24:07 -0700 (PDT), Harry K

Won't work if, as the OP states, the gasgot wet because the fuel pump gasket was put in wrong. If water got in, air pressure will get out.
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On Jun 29, 10:36am, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Depends on how big of a leak around the gasket. A compressor will override even a fairly large leak.
Harry K
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

this generally doesn't work on most modern cars. the fuel pump will shut off if the controller doesn't detect the engine running.
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