Use 1" furnace filter instead of 5" ?

On Thu, 03 Nov 2016 01:14:01 +0000, Allie

I buy my space guard filters on line (generic) and they are about $16
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On Wed, 2 Nov 2016 13:56:09 -0400, Ralph Mowery

The pleated paper filter is far more effective in taking out small particles. I ended up with both. My air handler is in a closet with a louvered door. I used "cut to fit" media on the door to stop the big stuff and a "space guard" on the intake for the rest of it. I can take the door media out in the yard and wash it with a hose and it seems to stop most of the stuff. The paper filters last at least a year. I have a gauge on the air handler that tells me when it is degraded.
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replying to gfretwell, Allie wrote: I had two filters also, at the outside grate and the 5" filter. Ac man said not to have the grate one. Will effect the air flow. I also looked into the "media" filters. I may get those. I also like the air sponge ones that fit in a metal frame.
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On Thu, 03 Nov 2016 01:14:01 +0000, Allie

The media I have on the louver door is over 12 square feet. That is not doing much to the air flow. It does catch a lot of stuff that is not making it to the pleated filter, it also keeps the closet a whole lot cleaner.
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replying to trader_4, Allie wrote: My house is not smoke filled. I for some reason it's dusty. Could be the florida humidity. I have 3 dogs. 2 years? Wow. You're lucky.
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Build a meter?
Buy: two or three feet of clear vinyl tubing (small diameter) two fittings for tubing to threaded (bulkhead fittings would be best, but more costly)
mount both fittings into sheet metal duct work, one on each side of filter -- upstream and downstream air flow. (Idea is that air handler can suck air thru them.) Make sure fittings are close enough together that tubing will hang down in a loose loop between them.
Fill tubing about 1/4 to 1/2 way with water. (Could add some food coloring to make the level easier to see.)
Connect both ends of tubing to fittings. (Easiest with air handler OFF.)
Note water level (might want to mark it) with air handler off. It should be equal on both legs.
Note water level with air handler on. With even a clean filter the legs will likely now be offset a little bit (downstream leg higher).
Water will move closer and closer to the downstream side of the filter as filter restriction increases. Too much restriction and you will have to refill the tube. :) (If you can find a little floating ball that will just barely freely fit inside the tubing, put it in the downstream side and it will prevent most of the water sucking out. Another ball on the upstream side makes it easy to see water levels.)
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That's a pretty good idea really. Although if you didn't want to mess with water and such I think you could do the same with a couple of cheap barometers one on each side.
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The advantage to the water-in-tube approach, is it is self-calibrating and balancing for filter restriction. A pair of cheap barometers might work, but there may be issues...
1) how do you attach them to measure the ductwork? Look for ones that have a fitting for tubing on their pressure bubble, and you'll still need the tubing fittings in your ductwork.
2) Look at all the cheap barometers in the store. Pick two that read the same. Suprising how many don't. :( Or just use one.
3) What range and precision will they read? We only need relative accuracy, but we need moderately high precision at one end of a large offset from ambient pressure in order see the effect of filter restriction.
sdb
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Or -
Honeywell sells a "filter" change meter. [It is a simple "flag" meter that attaches to the return air plenum.] By measuring the static it can be adjusted to "flag" when the draw becomes excessive. Cute little gadget.
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Sounds interesting. Couldn't find it. Have a link?
sdb
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sylvan butler wrote:

www.filters-now.com sells one from GeneralAire.$14.99.
Find it near the bottom of the Honeywell Whole House Filters page.
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http://www.filters-now.com/products/dhw.html
That's darn slick.
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sylvan butler wrote:

Unfortunately I have no ducting between the filter and the furnace cold air return. The filter box is mounted immediately to the furnace's side. Would the probe for that thing work if it were just placed inside the squirrel-cage area of the blower?
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Rick Brandt wrote:

Yes, when HVAC contractors installed my new unit,they tapped into the case to measure pressure drop, then sealed the hole. I see no reason why you can't do the same thing.
Make sure that the fan can't draw air around your probe. Seal the opening well.
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replying to Rick Brandt, Allie wrote: Thank you. I too have the 5" slot for the filter on my new ac unit. Had I known how expensive those dang 5" filters were, I never would've gotten it. I want to use 1 or 2" filters too, with a rigged system to keep it in place. Can you post pics of how you made yours?
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On 11/1/2016 4:44 PM, Allie wrote:

I want to switch to a 4 or 5" system so that I can maintain a higher flow volume getting through the system.
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replying to Allie, Ivan Z wrote: https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.filter-adapter-adp-6-c.1000668615.html can't find US version of this, but apparently "they do exist" - Filtrete filter adapter for 4“ and 2" openings down to 1" filter.
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Joseph Meehan wrote:

The thing about the 5" filters is that they start at roughly the same back pressure as a good 3M filter, but load up VERY slowly because of the VAST increase in surface area.
The 3M will be excessively loading the fan in under 90 days, in many cases, under 30 days, costs $15-$20 and has to be replaced 4 or more times a year.
The 5"filter won't get to the same back pressure as the 3M for 9 months to 12 months or longer.
Spend $45 once a year and trap more dirt and let your furnace run more efficiently, or spend $80 a year...
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