Drywall 9' walls


Any commercial drywall supply carries 9' drywall and 54" drywall for exactly your reason. Commercial work would usually run the 9' vertical, residential would run the 54.
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DanG wrote:

Why the difference for commercial vs residential?
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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net wrote:

in my office, it's 10' ceilings with a 1' drop ceiling for lights/ac.
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Metal studs, 5/8 firecode rock, no butt joints, drop ceilings.
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replying to Steve Barker, Iggy wrote: THANK YOU WILLSHAK! The first answer got it right, Steve I hope Vertical Installation's what you did. There's NO benefit nor advantage to the Horizontal Installation. It's the dumbest practice that ruins new everything right from the start and provides poor fire protection.
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On Thu, 17 Aug 2017 20:14:04 GMT, Iggy

How does it provide poor fire protection? Horizontal instalation makes it a whole lot easier to hide the joints too, which is why expert drywallers almost ALWATS install the panels horizontally - and use sheets longer than 8 feet.
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replying to clare, Iggy wrote: Very simply, the seams aren't air-tight and therefore not fire-tight. As proven by the nightly news (see YouTube). Story upon story of this building and that home burned down to the ground in less than 30-minutes...what drywall's rated for and easily capable of retaining a fire for. But, even the ASTM won't correct its decades-old error in The Code...I've tried for almost 15-years. If you haven't seen my posted-today list, Vertical Installation is so good that it's not required to be taped and mudded and is at its full level of fire protection upon installation.
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On Fri, 18 Aug 2017 03:14:02 GMT, Iggy

PROPERLY mudded the joint is as fire resistant as the rest of the drywall. What the stories don't tell is in many cases there is no "fire blocking" so when fire gets behind the drywall it's like a blowtotch. No difference between horizontal and vertical.
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replying to clare, Iggy wrote: That's what I initially thought, until I tried it and broke it down. A Vertical's seam is 100% backed and the full panel's entire perimeter edges are as well. However, a Horizontal seam only has a 1-1/2" support every 14-1/2"s. That's only about 10% of a seam that's backed. And, no-one does nor would waste the time to properly put any back-blocking behind the seam, which should be required.

I can kick and hammer a Vertical seam and nothing happens. But, with Horizontal I can just moderately lean against it to deflect it open and completely crack the seam open and loose. I've heard your point of better seam-hiding before and frankly I've only rarely witnessed it. I use just a 10" knife on my seams and then lightly sand with a block or pole sander's plate. No gaps, totally flat and entirely invisible, always.

You might enjoy My List. It's here, at the end/bottom: https://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/installing-drywall-318143-.htm
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On Fri, 18 Aug 2017 11:44:02 GMT, Iggy

If the first layer of joint compund is a "setting" compound, with the "drying" compound just used to finish, the joint won't separate when you lean on it. Dutabond 45 or durabobd 90 is made for that application. Use it carefully because it is hellishly hard to sand - it cures like concrete or plaster of paris, rather than drying like "drywall mud". It is also 100% fire resistant - better than the drywall itself. This is what I meant by "properly installed"
If you want full fire rated, install 1 layer vetically with screws, not mudded - then install the second layer horizontal , preferably with adhesive, and mud.
Commonly done on "shared" walls in wood-framed multi-unit residential buildings as a "fire break"
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replying to clare, Iggy wrote: Yep, I somewhat agree. However, that's why I came up with The List and purposely didn't even address your "proper installation". Because, now you're talking about specialty products and much more difficult practices being NEEDED to rather poorly try to match Vertical's performance on every level. And still, you're left with Butt Humps instead of flat walls. I even see "pros" using Butt-Boards to seam between studs (floating hack-work). Absurdly ridiculous!

I realize I may not bring you over from the dark side. But, why fix and patch shoddy work with more steps and specialty products when you can just do it simple, right and quick the first time with basic off-the-shelf products that are available everywhere? Again, a 90% un-backed seam will never compare to 100% backed seam. Even in fire tests, you'll immediately notice the tape and mud goes almost immediately and is non-existent anywhere at the end of the fire test. I think you should give Vertical a try next time around.
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On Fri, 18 Aug 2017 15:44:01 GMT, Iggy

You saying you can't buy DuraBond at your local home improvement store? And you are saying "drywall compound" isn't a "specialty product"? And you are saying my joints and installation are not as good or as solid as yours? I have NEVER has a drywall seam crack - and I don't have issues trying to get the drywall screws into the 2X4 withoit tearing out the edge of the drywall. I can keep EVERY screw a minimum of 2 inches from the edge except the ones at the end of the panel if my poanel is shorter than my wall. I can buy my drywall the size I need - 8,9, 10, or 12 feet long - so in MOST rooms, on MOST walls there is no vertical joint at all that needs to be butted on a 2X4. Sure makes joints a whole lot simpler when there is just one straight line around the room, and a few corners.

I did it vertically for years ubtill a real master showed me how it SHOULD be done, and how much simpler it is Do the ceiling first, with the long edge at right angles to the natural light or in line with the line of sight. Then install the top sheet on the walls, lenthwise - so you get the tapered edge of tje eall panel meeting the tapered edge of the ceiling panel along the line of site. When mudded, the joint is straight and considtent, and virtually invisible. Then cut the bottom panel to the correct size to fit between the floor and the top panel, leaving about half an inch space at the floor. Jack the panel into place and screw it down. You now have 2 tapered edges together to mud and tape. Absolutely no simpler way to make an excellent drywall job. Using setting compound, the joint is structurally sound and dry in less than an hour - and the thin skim of "drywall mud" required to finish the joint dries quickly - unlike a thick bed of muh that requires 18 hours or more to fully harden, particularly 0n a humid day. You can rock, mud, and sand a room in an 8 hour day this way - and even prime it before you go home for supper. It can be painted before midnight - and it WILL NOT CTACK. Old Johann finished the mud joint with a sponge, and it required almost no sanding at all. When I do it, I still need to sand a bit more, but not nearly as much as when doing it "the old way".
No issues with where the vertical joints meet the ceiling/wall interface either - dead straight joints, all around the room.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca posted for all of us...

Clare, I agree with your posts 100% I don't think fire protection is rated on horizontol or vertical installation or mudding.
I also think Iggy is your NYM shifting troll buddy.
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replying to Tekkie®, Iggy wrote: First, look up the meaning of troll, then use it correctly. I came after no-one. I simply defended myself and held a discussion. I answer the trolls, but they never answer me. Clare wasn't a troll and simply wanted an explanation and insight from the side that does it right and in the best interests of all.
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On Friday, August 18, 2017 at 8:44:07 PM UTC-5, Iggy-norant wrote:

ls,

-9-walls-426583-.htm

First things first. Look at the date of the discussions you are hot to have. Everything you're replying to is AT LEAST 7 years old.
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replying to ItsJoanNotJoann, Iggy wrote: Yeah so? I already explained this to you. And no, not nearly everything...a few things. I made a compliment here. And the others I added correct, relevant and expanding content to, for those asking themselves a similar question that happen upon the threads. You trolling me like I'm doing something illegal or detrimental IN THE SLIGHTEST is the ignorance I can't comprehend.

You clearly don't want discussion and you clearly don't have anything to add to the answers and you clearly think everyone else died and should be memorialized with the thread being retired and removed from the internet.

Do you want your legacy of contribution to be a bunch of incomplete answers? Do you want threads to die and to make it illegal if someone new comes along to expound upon the answers or to ask additional questions (where the original Asker dropped the ball)? Do you just hate interactive websites and absolutely won't ever respond to anything positively nor cordially, if it's on an old thread? Please get back to me when you make up your mind about what you're doing here or how the site can be better...you aren't helping currently.
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On Sat, 19 Aug 2017 12:44:01 GMT, Iggy

Some folks just like to put-others-down - I guess it makes them feel superior or something - don't waste your breath on them. As for myself - I appreciated your discussion - and the other constructive intelligent replies - thanks for resurrecting the old thread. ... except that - I'm so torn and conflicted by the great arguements for both sides that I'll probably hang my drywall oblique from here-on-in. John T.
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replying to hubops, Iggy wrote: Vertical's the only right way, but oblique would make you a true Artisan to the people that die from the same Horizontal-like poor fire-protection. If you didn't catch it, I BURIED Horizontal's laughable 3 benefits here: https://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/installing-drywall-318143-.htm
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Iggy posted for all of us...

As a retired/disabled emergency services person I have very serious doubts about the fire protection aspect of any taping method of drywall. I purport that there are numerous entry points other than drywall joints. The BEST protection is to have a working smoke and carbon monoxide detector.
I haven't read your quoted article and don't intend to because I am not signing up for HomemoanerHubless. If you wish to post it on a readily available site let me know and I will read it as I will your information from the NFPA site.
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replying to Tekkie®, Iggy wrote: Wow, that's pretty disabled...I'm not signed-up nor registered nor even use cookies and I romp around with no problem on a 10-year old computer. The link's right there and free for anyone to enjoy, just scroll to the bottom. Yes, please do give me any links you think are more useful, much appreciated. Smoke detectors are great, but not much help when the fire's spreading every second and not being contained as designed and intended.
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