Drilling porcelain tile

OK, what's the trick. This stuff just laughs at a Tap Con bit in a hammer drill (the carbide tip ends up melting) and if you try to shoot a tap con screw in it, you get a nail. It wipes out the threads. I just bought some Bosch super bits ($10 a pop) and I am trying them tomorrow. They say they will eat concrete with rebar in it.
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That is next but I couldn't find one today. I managed to get 3 holes in, 8 more to go. I might just burn up a few more bits and be done with it. I am going to squirt some water in there tomorrow. I know the tile guy was cutting them with a wet diamond saw but it was going very slow for him too.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com says...

YOu have to use something to break the glaze if not using a diamone bit. Take a carbid bit and hold it in your hand. Tap it with a hammer gently a number of times to the glaze is broken, then you can drill it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3VEbcfziT2A

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On Sun, 16 Feb 2020 23:38:00 -0500, Ralph Mowery

This stuff seems hard all the way through. I have seen a lot of porcelain tile but nothing like this stuff. Like I said, it stripped the threads right off a Tap Con screw, that ain't the glaze on top.
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On 2/17/2020 1:54 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Then perhaps it's not porcelain? Pictures?
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May be Kryptonite I suppose.
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On 2/17/2020 9:43 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

There you have it. You'll have to call Lex.
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On 2/16/20 9:50 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Knockout punch any use at all?
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On 02/16/2020 08:50 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Diamond drills and a lot of patience. Being able to use a drill press helps but I doubt that's an option for you.
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I've drilled various floor tiles, glass jars, ceramic vases, etc., with a diamond bit and cool water for lubrication. I used low speed and light pressure. Let the drill and bit do the work.
I say that without knowing exactly what you're trying to drill into.
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On 02/17/2020 09:38 AM, Jim Joyce wrote:

A company I worked for had a little side line in decorator quality lamps made from Fukagawa porcelain vases. We sort of had tryouts to find women that had the patience and light touch to drill them. The other problem was convincing them if a $150 jug broke, well shit happens.
We used Delft too but that was a piece of cake compared to Fukagawa. The Dutch called it porcelain but it really wasn't.
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wrote:

Treat it the same as glass.
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wrote:

The tile is on the wall. A drill pres is out. I managed to get one bar mounted today with the Bosch bits and water. The other "ain't arrove yet" (extra credit if you can name the movie). I have 6 more 1/4" holes to go. Pray for me. ;-)
Thanks for the ideas.
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