Bathroom faucet replacement question

My new bathroom faucet may arrive in the mail today. This will be my first repair of this nature and I have a question. Thank you for any comments!
Q: Since applying the supply lines to the faucet seems like the most difficult part of the job, why wouldn't someone push the supply lines through the top of the vanity and attach them to the faucet first (with plumbers tape, of course)? The plastic nuts, which secure the faucet to the vanity, could be slipped over the supply lines first for instance, and attached where they belong afterward. I ask this question, because the process I described doesn't appear to be the normal procedure.
Thank you! Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/19/17 9:07 AM, Bill wrote:

If you're using screw-on flexible supply hoses from the shut off valves to the faucet, I'm not sure you're supposed to use tape.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bobby Axelrod wrote:

We are talking about "teflon-tape", right? I don't see how it could hurt.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

It is not required because the threads do not do the sealing, and tape COULD interfere with proper seating of the rubber seal. DO NOT use teflon tape on self-seal supply hoses. If they are standard pipe thread fittings, use tape.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, October 19, 2017 at 9:39:08 AM UTC-4, Bobby Axelrod wrote:

any

cet to

on, because

Good point, you're right, you don't use tape on those. As to connecting the supply line first, then slipping it through, you can do that, as long as it works with that particular faucet. IDK what they do with bath faucet s today, but kitchen faucets typically have supply hoses already attached tha t extend down about a foot. You then hook your supply line from the angle valve to the hose end from the faucet. If you use flex supply lines, no reason you can't do it with a bath faucet as long as it will still attach to the sink, ie if there is a nut, that it will slip over, etc. It would be easier, which is I presume why the switched to that with the kitchen faucets. No more need for a basin wrench either, they use a hex head nut that tightens against a backing plate, you use a socket with extension.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
trader_4 wrote:

Yes, I can reach the plastic nuts. And the existing hoses look long enough to do as I described.
I am doing all this because last time I replaced some rubber parts to stop a drip, I ended up stripping the set screw. So here I am..
Thanks! Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, October 19, 2017 at 10:34:02 AM UTC-4, Bill wrote:

If they are flexible hoses, unless they are only a few years old, I'd replace them. HD, etc has them in various lengths, they don't cost much.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 19 Oct 2017 09:39:05 -0400, Bobby Axelrod

You are not.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
replying to Bill, Iggy wrote: A valid question and I've pre-attached the flexible and even straight-shot rigid supply lines whenever possible. However, they do sometimes get in the way and make a basin wrench more difficult to use, because you can't see through the supply lines to know if you're turning what you hope you are.

Where it really becomes a problem is with the cabinet size and style. You don't get many view angles in a 24" cabinet and same goes for cabinets that have a center stile between the doors. Wall Hung and Pedestal sinks can be quite tight and having the supply lines on can interfere with a basin wrench's use, on the handle end. Remember, Supply Valves are usually in the way too and, commonly, even the drain pipe from the wall or floor.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Iggy wrote:

Yes, things are tight enough under there that the less time I have to be there, the better I'll like it! ;)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

All the more reason to use the flex hose connections. They use a rubber gasket and you can get them for 3/8" compression or 1/2" threaded connections in any combination. Get the appropriate ones for your setup and off you go.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Okay, you've talked me into it. Home Depot should give you a commission. My reason for not replacing them, was that removing the old ones runs the risk of conceivably damaging the shut-off valves, but that doesn't seem like a good excuse--unless I somehow damage the shut-off valves, and in that case I'll be sorry! Hold the shut off valve with a wrench (or anything?) while removing the hose?
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Those hose connections can be finger tight and still work. I usually get them as tight as I can with my old arthritic fingers then put another 1/4-1/2 turn with a wrench but that is still not "break the pipe off" tight.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Fuck. If you can save a step with no ill effects do it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Yes.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote: > Hold the shut off valve with a wrench (or anything?) while removing the

Yes, if needed to prevent the stop from wracking
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 19 Oct 2017 16:27:44 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

But if you have 1/2" threaded connections you can't pull the mounting nuts on after the hose - for sure. With some other solutions it MIGHT be possible.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

With my (Moen) configuration, it would have been possible--the 2 fastener bolts and the 2 places where you attach hoses are separate and distinct. I could have attached the hoses before I dropped the unit through the top, and doing so would have saved time. With plumbers putty already under the template, my mind wasn't thinking that far ahead.
Highlights:
-I dropped the first of the two new faucet fastener nuts (not the plastic kind) and it fell below the floor of the vanity, into the abyss. This 15-cent nut turned the repair into a two day affair. I knew better than to work on Sunday evening...
-Putting teflon tape on the threads above your head lying on your back with both elbows inside the vanity, is sort of challenging. The static electricity, didn't help. The circumstances make you appreciate whatever peace and quiet you can get. I mean, the dog was worried about me and having my arm licked didn't really help.
-I've got new hoses now too (as was suggested here). I am using 20" hoses to span 6" to avoid stressing the hose. It was either 12" or 20" (at Home Depot), and adding a loop to the 12" one sort of stressed it. I don't wish to start a discussion about it, but Home Depot doesn't sell stainless connector hose--they sell BrassCraft (silver) braided-polymer hose. I went back to the store, after realizing I hadn't actually bought stainless hoses, and the salesman told me they were stainless, but I assured him otherwise. He encouraged me towards the 20" hoses, so we both taught each other something.
In summary, I have no more hot water drip, and the new 1-handle faucet is nice and smooth. It works much better than if I had paid someone else to install it, and I am much more savvy about what is under the sink! Thanks for your help (all)!
Cheers, Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, October 23, 2017 at 11:38:33 PM UTC-4, Bill wrote:

Teflon tape normally isn't required on the hose ends where they connect to the faucet, unless it's some unusual hose/faucet. The seal does not rely on the threads being sealed. What did the instructions say?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
trader_4 wrote:

The instructions for the faucet suggested teflon tape (might be handy for the installation), without going into any detail. I consider that the directions that came with the faucet were deficient. For instance, towards the end you are asked to "remove the aerator", but the directions don't direct you as to how. I tried for 10 minutes before I used the Internet to learn that it wasn't a "with your bare hands" sort of sub-task.
I didn't see the downside to putting tape on the (top) threaded connection (1/2" PID). I did not use any, at the compression connection. What does "PID" stand for (even wikipedia doesn't know)?
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.