Help tightening a pipe leading to a water heater

That 90 degree bend, it's a bit hard to see what's behind it? It is cold water supply you say? You will probably have to replace that 90 . It does look like a pressure-fitted part (I can't see a thread and it isn't copper, so it isn't soldered)  and if it started to rotate with the nut, it's pretty much done for. You may be able to find a flared-joint copper pipe with the right nut that you could cut (the pipe stub) to size and solder to a copper 90 degree bend which would have to replace that steel bend. A picture facing the blue nut would probably add enough detail to show it more clearly. You can add a picture to a reply here. But, yeah, I think the 90 itself has got to go.
Reply to
homeowners
I hope someone here can help me with this problem.
Recently I've been having noise issues with the water pipe leading to my electric water heater. I attempted loosen it, and ended up loosening it a bit too much and it started leaking.
I've isolated the supply, and I'm now in the process of tightening it up again.
I've included a photo to help describe the problem, when I attempt to tighten the nut circled in blue, it gets to a point where it starts to loosen the part circled in red. So I remove the whole piece, tighten the part in red again. Then the whole problem starts over again when I the nut starts to tighten.
Am I missing a technique? And what is this piece called? My best guess is a compression fitting, but obviously I have no idea what I am talking about, and if so, should there be some kind of seal inside? (there isn't).
[IMG]
formatting link
Reply to
andyh
Re: Help tightening a pipe leading to a water heater full size image
Re: Help tightening a pipe leading to a water heater full size image
 There's a thread behind the red circle? Well then, it would make the repair so much easier. All you need to do is to undo the nut again, then use plumbing pliers (like the ones on the picture below) to completely screw the stub with the loose nut on it out of its socket on the 90 degree bend. Check the thread on the stub once it's out and wrap some Teflon thread seal tape around the thread, then screw stub back in using the pliers and tighten it.
Once the stub is securely in, use a plumbing wrench to screw the nut back on. This time,  while you are tightening the nut, use the pliers to hold the stub from turning. If there's any play left in the 90 degree socket thread, tighten it at the same time you're tightening the nut, that should do the trick.
Reply to
homeowners
Plumbing tools, such as a wrench, must be used accurately and carefully to avoid costly, messy and dangerous errors. Oh, and don't forget to turn off your water supply before attempting any repairs on a fixture.
Reply to
Anonymous

Site Timeline Threads

HomeOwnersHub website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.