white dust from tap water in humidifier


ghbt wrote:

I just added a couple of tbsp vinegar to the water.

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As usual dipshit (serendipity) you dont know what your talking about..... To the original poster, "cold mist" humidifiers work with ultrasonic energy, it literally "cracks" the minerals in the water. the use of distilled water ONLY will stop the white powder. "warm" type humidifiers WILL NOT produce the white powder at all. Distilled is still preferred as you will get calcium and lime buildup in either humidifiers. Serendipshit is giving you BAD info, adding vinegar WILL NOT stop the dust, will make the house smell like a salad..., but to trailer trash.(Serendipshit) thats a major plus.
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Watch out, Rastis, or you'll get googled and threatened with an incoherent stream of insults for daring to say that Ms. Dipshit isn't the veritable fount of All Useful Knowledge. ;-)
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You're no better on the detail.

Fraid not, it just creates a mist of the water ultrasonically and that sees minerals that are in the water end up in the air as well, where they deposit on surrounding surfaces as the water evaporates.

Demineralised water is fine too.

Demineralised is fine too.

Correct.
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Use distilled water. I recall a high school experiment where a pot of water was boiled down to 1/4", refilled, and boiled again down to 1/4". The remaining water was a filthy-looking sludge. That was in Cleveland, Ohio where the water is very hard. The deposits on your humidifier should be cleaned off per manufacturer's directions (or you can use vinegar).
On Tue, 22 Mar 2005 20:28:04 GMT, "ghbt"

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tap
The dust is the salt in the water. Nothing you add to the water will remove salts, including vinegar. There are two possible solutions to the problem -- use distilled water or replace the humidifier with one that evaporates the water rather than spraying it into the air. In the long term, replacing the humidifier with an evaporative unit will probably be cheaper. Large evaporative units cost about $100, room sized units about $50 in the U.S. I use a larger unit for my 1200 sq. ft. house. It uses from 3 to 5 gallons a day here in the desert southwest (mild, but dry, winters). --- SJF
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Jeeze, where do you shop? I bought a small room size vaporizer four or five years ago for less than ten bucks.
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five
Yeh! I remember them now. Had one many years ago and it cost about $10. Pretty sure you're referring to the boiler type -- gallon jug, two electrodes and the resistance of the water heats it to generate steam. This is the one that requires addition of salt if your water is too pure.
My reference to evaporative humidifiers was to the currently popular type that draws air through wet filter pads. Guess the electric boilers are still around but I overlooked them. --- SJF
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SJF wrote:

Get the electric boiler type. Within ten years it will be well known that the cool mist humidifiers (actually atomizers) contribute to bronchitis and pneumoniae.
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wrote:

Before you put away that crystal ball, let us know who's going to win the World Series and the Kentucky Derby for each of those ten years, will ya?
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Bob Ward wrote:

Come on, if I told everybody that I wouldn't be able to make any money betting on those events. :-)
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Cool mist humidifiers have been around for over 25 years at the least - at any rate, it's more than 25 years ago when I saw my first one. If it's not known by now, chances are it never will be.
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Lou wrote:

Please let me assign to you this homework problem: How long have partially-hydrogenated oils and artificial trans fats been around?
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wrote:

"Salt". I just shook my head, when I saw that. :-) When I die, I want to go where dogs go!
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tap
The dust is from the mineral content of the water - it's probably calcium, but I've never heard it referred to as "chalk" in this context. You can either use distilled water which would be free of mineral content or switch to a vaporizer-type humidifier, one which in essence boils the water and emits steam. With this type, the mineral residue is left behind in the water reservoir.
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On Tue, 22 Mar 2005 20:28:04 GMT, "ghbt"

That's what comes from using an ultrasonic humidifier. Dissolved minerals, in my water its mainly calcium and magnesium sulphate, is carried in the fine mist. When that mist water evaporates the mineral content is deposited around the humidifier.
My solution for humidifying the house is to have a lot of house plants. If they thrive it means their respiration had kept the air in the correct humidity. I had disconnected the power humidifier in my forced air furnace because of lime buildup and because the water in the water tray was often slimy. That slime is probably mold and had caused respiratory problems.
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PaPaPeng wrote:

We just installed a power humidifier in our forced air furnace this year. Is there a way to prevent this slime?
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wrote:

Yes, I believe so. You can keep a static, low-level algaecide in the water. Such products are usually used (as slow dissolving tablets) in AC condensate drip pans and are actually a quaternary ammonium chloride disinfectant .
When I die, I want to go where dogs go!
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wrote:

Not likely as the furnace draws air from the whole house to recirculate. The sponge pad and the water tray make an excellent growth medium. The nutirents were probably from all the dander and other stuff picked up from the air. The humidifier disperses several gallons of water a day so there is no effective way of neutralizing the water tray contents either by adding chemicals. Who wants to breath chemical vapours anyway. I am handy enough to put in a home-made UV light source but thought better of it. The house plants idea is a lot more satisfying. Plants give of as much water as is required by them to thrive. If they thrive I do. They make the whole hose look a lot better too.
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