Wooden sinks again -- has anyone actually tried?


Having googled I've found several conversations on the topic of wooden sinks and the difficulty or otherwise of building one but no actual reports of success or failure ...
SO - did anyone actually try or were you all scared off?
I'm talking kitchen sink here, not the photography type so the glass sheet treatment isn't going to fly. Epoxy seems to be what is generally suggested to finish and waterproof, together with some sort of laminated wood to minmimise the shrinkage/expansion problem. Mahogany or teak the recommended woods.
This sink isn't going to see real hard work (single person household & there'll be a dishwasher too) but it needs to stand up to basic kitchen tasks.
Shape is basically a simple, rectangular box with rounded internal corners (like a Belfast style sink) so the wood construction bit won't be too tough. Target lifetime is somewhere around 5-6 years I guess; by then the novelty may be starting to wear thin and I can replace it with a commercial belfast sink (and if not I can make a new one!).
Advice, and above all practical experience (+ve or -ve), is solicited.
Thanks,
Nigel.
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Why? For beauty's sake?
I've used traditional Japanese ofuru (sp?) soaking tubs, and California winery hot tubs, but I don't think I'd want to deal with a kitchen sink of wood.
I'm certain the boat gurus could make it waterproof and/or beautiful. But practical?
Patriarch, exploring motivation today...
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Indeed, for beauty, or at least interest value ...
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Nigel wrote:

Oh, it's doable, but I'd guess the 5-yr lifetime will probably be optimistic if it's used at all---that is, if you intend to actually live in the kitchen preparing meals, etc. If you eat out all the time and never use it, that's something else.
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No experience at all, sorry.
But if I were to try, I would be tempted by goncalo alves. Should make a beautiful sink that will last forever.
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Nigel wrote:

You could try the method used when building kayaks of wood. Fibreglass cloth and epoxy.
Have a look here: http://www.oneoceankayaks.com/index.htm http://www.guillemot-kayaks.com /
JES
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I did it with my bathroom sink, cherry top with an undermount sink. I used two layers of System 3 thin resin, like the boat builders use, purchased from Woodcraft. I sanded each coat level, spent extra time making sure endgrain was well covered. The epoxy did soak into endgrain more than you'd have thought.
The cherry was not laminated or otherwise engineered.
I applied several coats of spar varnish over it all for UV protection and a better final appearance.
It's two years old now and no signs of problems. But we are pretty careful not to leave standing water on the surface. No big hassle, just a little attention. If we forget, the water does not leave rings or stains.
A few dings so far, no signs of the epoxy coat layer degrading where there are dings. No swelling or stains. If I'd only used varnish, I'm quite certain that wouldn't be the case.
To answer the usual question: no it doesn't look like plastic. The grain is very visible and rich.
Sorry, I don't have pictures available.
The epoxy I used is listed at woodcraft.com as the "Clear Coat Kit" #144501 . Try the epoxy on a sample board, subject the board to the expected kitchen conditions. You'll only be out a couple of bucks at the worst.
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Did one in the late seventies and soaked it in PEG in a moderately collapsed veneer bag for about a week.
Let it dry for thirty days and then used West System to clear coat it.
Had dinner at the owners about six months ago.
Still looked good.
Tom Watson - WoodDorker tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (email) http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1/ (website)
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Nigel wrote:

No practical experience with one but no reason you couldn't build it like a strip planked boat...one in which the planks are roughly square in cross section and glued one to another with water proof glue (Resorcinol being the best). Hulls like that are water tight - assuming decent joinery - and very solid but a PITA to repair.
Expansion/contraction would be no problem as it is in the same direction everywhere. Biggest problem would be joining the sides to each other and to bottom so that the joints are water tight.
Gluvit might be a good material for finishing. http://www.pyacht.net/cgi-local/SoftCart.exe/online-store/scstore/h-gluv it.htm?E+scstore
-- dadiOH ____________________________
dadiOH's dandies v3.06... ...a help file of info about MP3s, recording from LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that. Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
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Thanks for all your help and comments!
I guess it looks like I won't be going this route either (although one day I'm going to make a small trial).
Nigel.
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