wood glue in cold garage

I work almost exclusively in an unheated garage (in Michigan). During the winter months I tend to only work on the more fair days but I would like to find a wood glue (if one exists) that can be stored in a garage where temperatures get below freezing. Does such beast exist and if so what kind of extremes are we talking.
Thanks in advance
PS:Please do not try to contact via the address, it is jsut for google posting purposes.
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I use TiteBond pretty much exclusively now, having forsaken Elmer's long ago. I notice some increased thickness but it does work ok here. With that said, winters in Oklahoma usually don't go below about 10 degrees F, but like you I work in a completely unheated garage. Usually the only way I get heat out there is to spend 30 minutes welding something. ;) I built my wife's 3 china cabinets out there last winter in about 30 degree weather and they're fine.
The label does say that temperatures below freezing will "not affect this product, though may cause thickening".
Michigan is alot colder, so I don't know what your results may be, but good luck!
George

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======================A simple small box 12"x12 " or so...with a small electric light (15 watt ).. is what I use every wnter...
Bob Griffiths
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I use the box, not the light. I just carry glue and paints into the house. Ed
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Get an old refrigerator, and put a 25 watt bulb in it, and store stuff without worry of freeze. You can put a baseboard thermostat on it to prevent overheating.
--
Jim in NC



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On 27 Oct 2003 18:40:01 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (daryl1138) wrote:

When I've worked in setups like yours, I simply built some trays with handles to hold stuff that shouldn't freeze. At the end of each session, I simply brought the trays inside and stored them.
Brightly painted milk crates also work well. At most, you'll probably have one or two.
This is less of a pain then you'd think and also works well for materials stored in trucks.
Barry
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i've used tightbond for decades. When I was in an unheated shop, I just let it stay out there. If it was warm enough to work in the shop, it was warm enough for the glue to set up. I've had it freeze, and its worked fine after thawing. When its cold, it gets a bit thick and stiff, but still works OK..... I'm in New hampshire, so Cold here means something in the -15 to -20 F range....
--JD

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On 27 Oct 2003 18:40:01 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (daryl1138) wrote:

Maybe--I havn't heard about such glue. But the typical yellow carpenter's glue (made from milk I believe) should not be subjected to freezing temperatures. I'd like to hear about glues that can be frozen, though.
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Phisherman states:

First, yellow glues are PVAs, not made from milk--you're thinking of casein glues, I believe.
Second, most PVAs can be frozen and used after thawing, but there are a limited number of cycles.
Third, using cold glue in a cold shop is a great way to get a weak joint that will fail prematurely.
Charlie Self "Ain't no man can avoid being born average, but there ain't no man got to be common." Satchel Paige
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My yellow glue froze last year in my shop. It turned into something resembling stiff yellow foam. It never returned to a liquid state and I threw it out.
One thing I'm going to try is putting a refrigerator in my (frozen) shop. Having a supply of brewskies near at hand always improves my woodworking and I'm thinking the fridge might keep the glues and stuff from freezing.
Anyone tried this?
Charlie Self wrote:

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Refrigerators in cold areas are another potential problem. It may or may not work. Some will cease working completely from the cold as they are designed for ambient over 50 degrees.
If the ambient gets below freezing, so will the inside of the fridge, it will just take longer as it is insulated. Ed
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On Tue, 28 Oct 2003 09:33:02 -0500, Bill Delphenich

I love beer, but I love woodworking more. The trick is keeping the two separate for safety sake.
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Bill Delphenich wrote:

It probably would keep them from freezing, I'd expect.
Brewkies in the shop sounds like a bad plan unless you're one of those guys who can drink five gallons of beer without getting wasted. Me, after just one I don't trust myself to use power tools (especially not the table saw), and after two I don't trust myself to use hand tools. I get sloshed on three beers usually. Four I'm completely hammered, and five I'm a pukey duck.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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