Why do we call it "Stain"?

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Why do we call it "stain"?
"A soiled or discolored appearance", reads one definition. Surely this is not our intent.
"To bring into disrepute, taint or tarnish", is another. Certainly not that!
"A blemish on one's moral character or reputation", oh my!
"To soil with foreign matter", shameful!
It leads one to believe that the definitional progenitors speak only of the application of foul substances to freshly prepared cherry, in which case they might have the right of it, whilst not solving for all instances and intents.
We must needs rehabilitate this terminology. We must prescind from its unfortunate linguistic antecedents and embrace a more felicitous phraseology.
One might initially and reflexively suggest the use of, "Color", although that smacks of what the brethren at Crayola are up to.
Then again, "Enhance" might fill the bill, but it is so ensnared in the current trend involving the ballooning of lips and breasts, to the point of cartoonish excess, that one would not wish to be so associated with the term.
"Fake", certainly describes the intent, albeit not the intention of the effect of the affect (or, if that the affect of the effect?). I would suggest the use of "Faux", but that would be a misdirection through indirection.
Well, we are obviously in a quagmire whichever way we turn on this. It might be best to let the wood speak for itself and not involve ourselves in the nasty propinquity of dissimilitude and verisimilitude.
Well, that's about it.
I haven't the slightest idea of how to solve this problem and leave the floor open to my bettors.
Regards,
Tom Watson
tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email)
http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
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well, given that the intent of most stains (the woodworking sort, that is) is to simulate the effects of age, the name may not be as great a misnomer as all that....
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On Mar 26, 8:51 pm, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Don't overlook the role stains play in the quest of homoginizing different flitches of wood. If one builds a single piece of furniture from a mix of white- and red oak, ash, and others, to apply a nice heavy stain will certainly make it all look 'the same'. Grand Rapids furniture, from the tail end of the 19 th century to the l950's was often stained heavily for just that purpose. There are many examples, both historic and current.
r
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We call it "stain" or "stained" because you can't throw it in the washing machine with Tide and have bare wood when the cycle is over.
:)
wrote:

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Umm that would be because it "stains" the wood. What prompted you to ask the question? Or should I have asked, what reason did you have to ask that question?
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Snip

Umm, perhaps to dust off some words we (the vast unwashed majority) don't often get a chance to use? Tom
--
Maker of Fine Sawdust and Thin Shavings
Take out the One to email me.
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I believe you hit the nail on the head.
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Tom Watson wrote:

regards John
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Amen, brother. My wife complains that it looks like I've been picking my ass all day.
wrote:

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Matt In Fenton wrote:

Come back after you've used orange Solar Lux.
It looks like you've just had major surgery. <G>
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Ipe dust also makes you think that you have been badly cut. The dust is bright yellowy green until it gets dampened by sweat or a cleaner like CMT Formula 2050. Then the dust turns Blood Red.
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Leon wrote:

Ewww...
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Discolor is exactly what we are trying to do when using stain, is it not :)
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That's a funny word.
Are we "coloring" or "discoloring"? Is that like local usage for the spring phenomenon "unthaw"? (which happens to druive me nuts).
Perhaps it's just the pejorative form: dis'ing [sic] the coloring process.
rambling....
Steve
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Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


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Being from Houston, the word "Thaw" coming from the weather reporters mouth would be foreigh to me. ;~) Unthaw would be to ReFreeze, no?
What drives me nuts is, the vehivle "over turned" what happened to "rolled over"? Are they sure that the vehicle over turning was the cause of the roll over? May be the vehicle was going straight when it rolled over.
The wrecker uprighted the over turned vehicle. Why not, the wrecker turned the car over.
And my all time favorite form the cute young thing that was the traffic girl and is now the news anchor,
The airplane "skidded into a crash".
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message

Now we're getting into the fascinating area of common usage. I claim some experience in this area as I have lived and worked in four English speaking countries and the differences in usage continue to fascinate me. "Overturned" (note: one word) sounds right to me as does "rolled over". However, I would say that "overturned" would be the more precise term of the two. "The wrecker uprighted the over turned vehicle" contains some redundancy: "uprighted" implies that the vehicle was already "overturned". "skidded into a crash" is interesting. It doesn't bother me too much but I would be inclined to say "skidded and crashed".
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or all the way.

Unless there was an existing crash, and the driver added to it. (Although nouning verbs is one of those things that often grates upon me. ;)
--
flip
Just on the border of your waking mind, There lies - Another time,
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A friend and I were "conversating" about that just the other day. ;~)
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Jimbo wrote:

To me "skidded into a crash" implies that it collided with a pre-existing crash.
Bill
--
http://nmwoodworks.com/cube


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. To clarify, the airplane went sliding off the runway through the fence into on coming traffic on the near by road way. It and a car collided as a result.
The airplane skidded into a crash.
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