Why do i need a jointer?

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Silvan wrote:

Maybee they're following in the footsteps of the greats. I have heard/read that when Wm. Shakespear needed a word that rhymed, he invented one. ;-)
-- Mark
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over
in
More than likely the lumber store used a jointer to get that straight edge, so you're basically farming that out, which is why you don't need it for that. It sounds to me like you're not buying rough lumber but S3S, which is (or should be) ready to plane to your desired thickness and rip to width. People who truly buy rough lumber use either a hand plane or a jointer to get one of the faces flat and then either the hand plane again (more power to them) or a planer to bring it to a consistent thickness. So, if you're buying S3S, it's relatively easy to get around using the jointer.
todd
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You do not.
If you were buying bowed, twisted, or warped wood it would help you flatten or straighten the wood. I have a jointer and it is probably going to disappear. Most the lumber that I buy is pretty good to start with as apparently is yours.
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Hi Roger,
I consider myself an amateur woodworker with almost 20 years shop (hobby-type) time.
I convinced myself that I needed a jointer about 10 years ago while watching Norm. Set out to get the best deal I could and eventually bought a Delta 6-incher.
I swear that next to the table saw, I use it more than almost any other tool (ok, maybe the router is second!).
Anytime I want to shave off a 64th or 32th, guess what I plug in? Sure, you can do it with a hand plane or a TS (maybe), but for fast, accurate truing (sp?), I would not trade the jointer for anything.
Certainly, you can do without it, but it is a great piece of iron to have around when you need it.
After 20 years of working without one tho, I would say just keep on doing what you're doing if you're happy with the time & process you use. On the other hand, if you have to ask, maybe you do need one!
Happy woodworking!
Lou

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jointers are bunk.
they don't really do anything. just another mysterious gadget invented to separate unwitting woodworkers from their hard earned cash....
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On Tue, 28 Dec 2004 18:18:48 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@all.costs wrote:

My DJ-20 gives a much closer shave than anything at the grocery store.
Barry
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Time is money. After a couple of years I think I've finally recouped my investment on the jointer. It definitely speeds things up.
In my experience, rough lumber with one side cut straight is never truly square to the face of the board. It may appear so when you are selecting the boards, but when you let it rest in your workshop you'll probably get a bit of movement. A jointer will make quick work out of re-straightening and re-squaring the boards. And if you need to cut larger stock to smaller width with a bandsaw, you are going to release some pressure in the stock which will surely make it move (depending on the species you're working with).
I use the jointer to generate a flat (albeit with circular cutter waves) edge, then remove any cup on the face while at the same time creating a square edge. Unfortunately you need to always calibrate your jointer to make sure it is square to the fence.
If I'm joining boards into a panel, I find that the jointer really isn't enough. It looks good, but there may be 0.01" or so gaps along the edge of the boards. However, these edges are square.
I then take the 2 boards to be joined together and clamp them (facing edges up) to the table. I use a long benchplane to smooth both edges together. This removes circular marks from the jointer blade and makes sure that the 2 edges match perfectly.
And forgive me, Norm, but if you do it this way you don't need to use biscuits or an $800 Lamello biscuit jointer.
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Right!
I carry a 6" combo square in my apron at all times, as I'm constantly using it. Checking the jointer takes 5 seconds, I don't bother if I'm face jointing.
If carrying the square dosen't suit your habits, why not buy a $4 drafting triangle and leave it at the machine?
Barry
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"Geoff" wrote in message

Bingo on all counts. My payback was a bit quicker. I basically paid for a Powermatic 54a by milling free walnut 'scraps' from a sign shop into 3x3x36 leg blanks. For $11.75 b/f for S4S 3" walnut blanks, it didn't take long.
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[snip]

I s'pose I should not argue with success, but if the two boards have their (soon-to-be) facing sides up for planing together, how does that make sure that they match? Seems you would have mirror images in your result. Now, the mirrors may be perfect so that they are perfectly tight when put together. But if there is an error along the way, doing it your way _seems_ to raise the propsect of a compounded error -- i.e., take a little two much off along the way and when the edges face each other the gap will be twice the amount you took off. OTOH, if your technique is as good as your results suggest, then doing the two boards at once would seem to save time and effort. But, again, doing it _this way_ would not seem to help ensure a perfect match. My hunch is that _you_ would have a perfect match even if you did the boards one at a time.
Caveat: I say all this having used neither a jointer nor one of these high-f'luttin planes some of youse guys have. I'm just trying to follow along. -- Igor
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"igor" wrote in message

You're right, nothing is ever perfect (and the more expensive the wood, the less perfect it is, particularly when you're on the last piece). But, if done properly, the described method will give you "perfect enough" results than you would get by doing the edges one at a time without some stable, and repeatable reference, preferably perpendicular to the edge you're preparing.
Assuming the faces of the stock are parallel, the idea is to insure that the joined edges, if not precisely 90 degrees each, are at least 'complementary', in that they add up to 90 degrees.
IME when planing with this method, which is limited, it works best when the thickness of the two pieces clamped together is less than the width of blade doing the cutting, so that both edges are cut all the away across on the same stroke.
Actually, you don't even need to go out to the shop to see the principle in action. Grab a piece of paper and scissors and cut out two virtual tubafours. Lay them on top of each other and snip one end off with the scissors, either straight across, or at a slight angle. Now join the two snipped ends and they should match.
You can do the same thing on a jointer, and remove any small error in the fence being 90 degrees to the tables, by alternating good-face-in, good-face-out, when jointing for long grain edge to edge glue-ups.
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I think that he means the angle of the edge. I sympathize with that: I find it much harder to maintain a 90 deg angle than I do in obtaining a "straight edge" (or something very close).
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GregP wrote:

Just don't try that on a chess board. It reallllly matters. I had everything smooth as glass and perfectly adjoining, at whatever not quite perfect angle it happened to be until it fit right.
Actually, the fit wasn't the problem, but the thickness. I wasn't thinking. I wound up with random width boards. Looked really stupid after the second cut, with every "square" a different size.
Oops.
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Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
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Obviously, someone of your caliber doesn't!

over
in
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Being less of a woodorker than yourself, I use a jointer.
Humility apparently isn't your strong suit.
David
Roger M. wrote:

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You only need a jointer if you aren't satisfied that your boards are straight and square, without cup or twist.
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"Roger M." wrote:

...
If your work habits are pleasing to you and you can accomplish what you want w/o one, I'm not going to try to persuade you otherwise...
If, otoh, you're interested in purchasing lumber rough sawn and/or want to take on more or larger work and perhaps do some of the routine work more quickly, then a jointer may be of some advantage. However, <if> you do decide on one, I would recommend that nothing less than an 8" one will satisfy for the long run unless small work is all you do, but even there being able to face joint something wider than 6" is a real benefit.
IMO, YMMV, $0.02, etc., ...
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========================What can I say except that I have been creating sawdust for 20 years LONGER then you and I need a ...Jointer.
It just seems to me that anyone who would go to the trouble to have his supplier put one straight edge on his rough lumber then " plane" that same rough lumber (by hand or not) then glue up a panel would also take the time to grab the resulting glued up panel and plane and sand it himselp....
Maybe my definition of rough lumber is different then yours...
Somehow I think you are starting with lumber that is surfaced on 3 sides ...(that is not rough cut lumber by my definition) then gluing it up then hauling it to a local shop to have the faces sanded flat......
Just my thought...
Bob Griffiths
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There you go. Try getting those edges straight when you come across a gloat of 1500 bf of <insert wood species here>. It's been my experience that all edges are rough (if not in raw log form), twisted, and need to be jointed. Try doing that on your General. Soooo, you keep buying your expensive lumber and you don't need a jointer. Good on ya. SH - Still wanting the 16" man machine.
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Sounds like you don't need a jointer but have some money to spend. So why not spend the money on a drum sander then you don't have to take it to someone else to finish off your projects?
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