What is it? Set 529

I need some help with 3088 and 3090 in this week's set:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/
Larger images:
http://imgur.com/a/ao69Y
Rob
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3089 I have no idea what specific type of anti-tank landmine this is.
On 1/23/2014 4:26 AM, Rob H. wrote:
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Landmine is correct, I haven't found the specific type yet either.
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Rob H. wrote:

Yeah it's a strange fuse arrangement. Usually the fuse is separate and screws in. Makes it safer and easier to carry.
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Steve W.

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3086 Looks like a crown cap crimper.
On 1/23/2014 4:26 AM, Rob H. wrote:
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It's definitely a cap crimper but I'm not sure if it's for crown caps.
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3086 Bottle capper
3087 Miter Saw
3088 Wood lathe gouge with depth gage
3089 Land Mine
Robert
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I still don't have an answer for this one, the owner thought it might be for removing large staples since that part on the bottom can be used as a fulcrum, but that is just a guess.
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3088 - reminds me of a tool to be held in a vise to help apply a " (heat) vulcanizing tire patch" (or similar).
Bill
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On 1/23/2014 4:26 AM, Rob H. wrote:

Posting from my desktop PC in the livign room as always.
3085, might be something from wool carding and sorting? 3086, might be for dissembling a faucet? 3087, first thought is "mitre saw". Looks like the part that holds the saw keeps the edge parallel to the work table. Not sure why. 3088, sampler for coffee beans? 3089, military land mine? 3090, totally no clue. As with the rest of em.
Great set, you really got me thinking.
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Christopher A. Young
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On 1/23/2014 8:05 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I think you are probably close. I suspect that it keeps the blade parallel to the work surface as a coincidental result of the design. I think the purpose is actually to keep the face of the blade perpendicular to the work surface.
ALTHOUGH, as you said it may keep the cutting edge parallel with the work surface so that you don't cut through the wood base and into the metal structure.
Or "C" all of the above. ;~)
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    Much simpler mitre boxes do that part quite well.

    That seems to be most of the purpose of the mechanism.

C1)    If the slot in the back fence were wider, I could speculate a     mechanism on the back (not shown clearly) to allow the cut to be     at a compound angle, but that seems to not be the case.
C2)    Perhaps it also allows the weight of the mechanism to provide     the needed downforce on the saw blade, thus easing the work for     the operator.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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I just sent the owner an email asking his opinion on the purpose of the upper mechanism, I'll post his answer when I receive it.
Not much luck yet on the mystery tools in this set, here are my answers for this week:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/2014/01/set-529.html#answers
Rob
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Someone found the patent for the miter box and saw holder, it can be seen here:
http://www.google.com/patents/US847557
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3085 is a stonemason's tool called a crandalling hammer. It is used to put a textured surface on the face of a stone block.
Paul K. Dickman

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Crandall hammer is correct.
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The owner is looking for information on the upper part, such as patents, manufacturer, value, etc.
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    Posting from the usenet newsgroup rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
3085)    Looks like a scaling hammer for chipping off welding scale.
    I presume that the end of the handle has a way to loosen the     grip so the points can be removed, sharpened, and replaced, or     totally replaced when worn out. That loosening will also allow     the points on the other side to be aligned for use before having     to remove and re-sharpen the points on all of them.
3086)    Well ... it certainly is a form of crimper.
    I'm not sure about the diameter. It *looks* a little too big to     be used for crimping soft drink and old style beer bottle caps,     but otherwise it would work well for that. A bit old, however,     as something for food use would have to be of a different metal     (easier to clean) that this appears to be.
3087)    Well ... first off, it is obviously a miter saw.
    As for the mechanism -- it appears to be designed to keep the     blade from tilting as it goes down.
    It is interesting that the vertical travel available is a lot     larger than the usable width of the blade, which suggests that     it is intended to make level cuts at whatever angle is set down     to a limited depth.
    It appears to lock at the top of travel -- perhaps for putting     the new workpiece in place without a risk of scaring the     surface of the workpiece by dragging against the saw teeth. To     start cutting, you apparently pull the ring to unlock it and     allow it to descend onto the workpiece.
3088)    If the end were a little sharper, I would think that it is a     wood turning gouge designed to make a round bottomed groove in     the workpiece, and a straight plunge to a specific depth     (stopped by the projection apparently silver-soldered onto the     bottom of the tool.) The sides would guide it once it reached     a certain depth.
    It may actually have once been that sharp -- hard to tell from     the photos.
3089)    This is *not* your friend once you pull the ring. :-)
    It is a "mine" -- designed to be implanted by a vehicle which     plows up the ground, plants the mines every so often, and then     closes the sod down on the mine -- leaving little sign of the     disturbed sod. As it departs, it pulls the pin by the ring.     The vertical projections are probably what triggers it.
3090)    Is there a notch in the claw as is common in woodworking     hammers? Hard to be sure, given the angle of view.
    Is the edge sharpened, or dull enough to grip and use it as a h     normal hammer?
    Why is the wrench for various sizes of square nuts or bolt heads     in the second image? I would think that it would work for     wagon style construction, and if it is in the same image,     perhaps the "blade" of the handle is used to operate or adjust     something in the wagon.
    Now to post and see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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Yes, I think there is a notch in it.

I'd say it's dull enough to grip, though the owner didn't specify. I think someone just replaced a wood handle with this metal one. Probably not mass produced, but I posted it to find out if anybody had seen one like this before.

I guess the wrench is supposed to be for scale, not sure why it was included.
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3089 - Adjustable miter box ... it looks like there's mechanism to the right of the saw to hold down the stock. (The top of the saw's tote is broken off ..)
3089 - Anti-tank land mine
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