What is it? Set 386

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Canvas stretcher is the closest guess so far, it was used on an animal farm in England, Wales or Scotland.
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Sheepskin hides?
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writes:

No but sheep is the type of animal it's related to.
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    posting from rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
2227)    Looks like a tool for straining out lumps from a sewage     pool.
    If the vanes are sharp edged, perhaps for chopping something up     to fine particles.
2228)    At a guess -- it goes on the inside of a door, and there     is a similar decorative piece on the outside. This is     similar in function to the wide-angled peepholes in apartment     and older hotel doors.
    The trapdoor keeps it from being used to spy into the apartment,     and the rest is to hide the existence of it in decorative     features. The similar decorative feature on the outside of the     door would simply disguise the presence of a hole in all the     filigree -- at least until someone opened the inside trapdoor.     Ideally, there would be a glass plate between the two, so     someone could not poke the trapdoor open from the outside.
    I guess that it could also serve to close a speaking tube from     the apartment down to the entranceway -- preventing its use for     eavesdropping, and again hiding what would be otherwise an ugly     feature.
2229)    Looks quite similar to the adaptors used to take a hand-held     electric drill and turn it into a marginal drill press.
    Except that the drill motor here does not look like a hand-held     electric drill. This may have been made this way from scratch     as a low-budget drill press, or be the result of someone     modifying one of the adaptors to make something a bit more     usable.
    Interesting features here include the suction cup operated by a     lever to lock it onto a smooth work surface, and the open frame     in the drill area with at least what looks like marks at the     near edge to show the centerline of the drill. The frame has a     recess to allow a backing plate to be dropped in, and I suspect     that there is another mark along the front (a view which we     don't get in these photos) to help form a set of cross-hairs for     positioning the workpiece. It also appears to have fine     adjustments for making the table of the drill press level, which     suggests some specific task for which being level is quite     important.
    The wiring looks like perhaps around 1930-1950 period. Given     that the plug is right in front of the column of about the same     color I can't really tell whether it is a two-pin or a three-pin     plug.
2230)    "Combs" used for making the decorative swirls in the inside     cover pages of old (or newer hand-bound) books.
2231)    To hold black powder for something like a starters gun?
2232)    For moving logs?
    Now to see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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Where I found this tool the vanes were called blades so I would say they're probably sharp edged, so "chopping something up to fine particles" is a good guess for this one.
Rob
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Has anyone asked what the text says on the second one?
--riverman
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wrote:

I did a translation on the text, I was figuring that they were just names, below is the before and after:
BREVE DIN Von S.G.D.G. H. FROMONT EN FRANCE & A L'ETRANGER
BRIEF DIN Von S.G.D.G. H. FROMONT IN FRANCE & THE COUNTRY
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