What is it? Set 336

Page 2 of 3  


Hi Rob,
Without the link to the larger image I can't do it. It showed up on my Norton as 4 instances of something like 'Bloodhound' virus. Hope that's enough to go on. If they want more, give me the link and I'll copy the message.
LD
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1927 Mortising jig 1928 Fancy alarm cover 1929 hand Cigarette roller paper holder 1930 Hay bails covered in the field? 1931 not an old dumbbell?
Mike in Ohio
Rob H. wrote:

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1928 - secures a reinforcing rod or cable
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) fired this volley in

Called a tie bolt escutcheon. Found on a lot of early colonial buildings to take up rafter thrust on outer roof-bearing walls.
LLoyd
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote in message

I did a search on "tie bolt escutcheon" but the only hit I got on it was back to this thread, maybe you saw it in a book?
Rob
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No, Rob, I "saw" it during an on-site six year historical and anthropological study of old Colonial Williamsburg.
Almost every building in that colonial capital over one story had them. The escutcheons were artistically fashioned by local smiths to suit the builder/owner, and had all variety of shapes from stars to hearts to family crests.
LLoyd
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> fired this volley in

I should have said "stone or brick building". Frame buildings used collar ties.
LLoyd
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Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

This publication calls them "decorative bearing plates." (figure 6) http://www.gobrick.com/bia/technotes/t44.pdf
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Lloyd E. Sponenburgh <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote:

You'll find them in Philadelphia in brick buildings older than about 1900 or so. They were mostly retrofits added after people noticed walls bulging out on some of the buildings.
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The problem with socialism is there's always
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My high school had these. The rods went all the way through the building, looked to be 1" rod as I recall. Stone building built in late 1800's.
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1930 free-range chicken huts/coops.
LLoyd
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Good answer, that's what they were used for.
-----
All but the last one were identified correctly this week, you can check out the answers here:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/2010/05/set-336.html#answers
Rob
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Rob H. wrote:

...
If that is intended as serious, here that would be better known as a coyote snack bar...
:)
Where are those then, pray tell????
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Actually I think they are for roosters but his answer was close enough, check out the photo at the answer for this one:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/2010/05/set-336.html#answers
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Rob H. wrote:

Oh, so it wasn't a bale used as cover after all, you're saying...the image was so small I thought they were small netwrap bales and you were saying that was being used as nesting/protection sites...
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    I have to disagree (at least in part) with 1928.
    These are also found in old town Alexandria, Virginia, not an area with a history of serious earthquakes. I have at least one photo from about 1962 or so which shows one, and I remember seeing them in many places -- both the star shape and the 'S' shape ones as well.
    Yes -- they are probably used for earthquake reinforcement in areas where earthquakes are common -- but they are also used in old brick construction buildings (e.g. most of these buildings are pre Civil War in construction -- including the house which my folks had in Alexandria when I was a kid -- up part way through college.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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DoN. Nichols wrote: )     I have to disagree (at least in part) with 1928. ) )     These are also found in old town Alexandria, Virginia, not an ) area with a history of serious earthquakes. I have at least one photo ) from about 1962 or so which shows one, and I remember seeing them in ) many places -- both the star shape and the 'S' shape ones as well. ) )     Yes -- they are probably used for earthquake reinforcement in ) areas where earthquakes are common -- but they are also used in old ) brick construction buildings (e.g. most of these buildings are pre Civil ) War in construction -- including the house which my folks had in ) Alexandria when I was a kid -- up part way through college.
They are also used in the Netherlands, which has virtually no earthquakes, and certainly none that would affect buildings. They are simply used to keep the walls from being pushed apart by the roof.
SaSW, Willem
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Disclaimer: I am in no way responsible for any of the statements
made in the above text. For all I know I might be
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--
Actually they were in use in Charleston before the earthquake but that
has become their name in Charleston ever since the earthquake. Perhaps
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In my answer for the star I didn't mean to imply that they were only for areas that experience earthquakes, I just changed my answer to read:
"An anchor plate or bearing plate, it's connected to a through bolt, which ties the wall and floor systems together to give extra support to the wall. In earthquake zones they are sometimes called earthquake bolts, though they are also used in many areas that are not prone to quakes."
Rob
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1931 Bar shot -- often part of a chain-shot combination, but also fired alone for taking out masts and rigging on an enemy vessel.
LLoyd
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