What is it? CXLVIII

This week's set has just been posted:
http://puzzlephotos.blogspot.com /
Rob
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847 a whatthehellisthis. 848 no idea where this accumulator-pack comes from 849 target for some toys? for pistol for pressured air? 850 the numbers on the scale can be hardly read. Thermometer? Barometer? some device for measuring viscosity? 851 this is a whatthehellisthis. Angle meter for inside corners? 852 stock exchange ticker machine the newest model from year 2006? ehr, year 1806?
sorry, again more guessing than knowing. but i like it.
greetings from germany chris
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848. I don't know what it's for either. The interesting thing is all I ever see in batterypacks for tools is sub C and evidently it has no case. Karl
R.H. wrote:

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R.H. wrote:

Just a couple this week.
848 NiCad battery pack - from ??
852 Ticker Tape machine
Howard Garner
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847 ?? 848 "guts" out of a pp3 battery - 9V 849 opthalmological test tool 850 wet / dry RH thermometer 851 ?? 852 ??
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849. Location indicator to show where a target was hit at a shooting range. 850. Blood pressure gauge. 851. Angle finder 852. Ticker machine.
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847 I've seen something similar that was a guage used on saw blades. Yhis one looks a little rough for that?
848. Battery pack out of a standard 9V battery. IIRC the cells are AAAA size. At one time there was a red dot sight (for firearms) on the market that required the user to disassemble a 9V to get batteries for it. Didn't last long.
852. First thought was stock ticker. But I'm going to say it's the machine used to "punch the tape" on a early computer controlled lathe or mill. We had a few of these in the early 70's at a company I was working for at the time. Very early CNC.
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848. Are you refering to alkaline batteries? The carbon ones I took apart as a kid were wafer shaped. Karl
Bill Marrs wrote:

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R.H. wrote:

Hi Rob
848 Battery Pack to something 850 Tests CO content for furnace efficiency 852 Ticker tape machine
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852 looks like it might be a simple morse code recorder. Essentially a device to record the dots and dashes.

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http://www.uv201.com/Misc_Pages/foote_pierson_register.htm

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847 - Shelf Support
848 - unencapsulated 9V battery pack (probably NiCd)
849 - Opthamologist's device for testing for Ambliopia
850 - Thermometer
851 - Pipe caliper
852 - Teletype sending unit. [ One reel is missing. ]
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    As always -- posting from rec.crafts.metalworking.
847)    Hmm ... cast iron, and backside view. Perhaps the front legs     of a fireplace dog for supporting logs to be burned?
848)    A set of six cells (probably NiCads) connected (by spot welding)     in series, and with the wires from the end terminals pulled or     cut off. This should have been in some powerpack for a     rechargeable tool or device. Voltage would be 7.2V with NiCads     -- a bit more voltage with NiMH cells.
849)    Perhaps for indicating where on a target the hit was (by staff     who are down in a safety pit during the actual firing.
850)    That is a strange one. The upper part is a bubble level while     the lower looks like something designed to leak a substance at a     selected angle (I not that the level does not appear to have a     center zero). At a guess, I would say that it is some system     for measuring viscosity of a liquid.
851)    I think that I see the Stanley logo partially obscured, but I'm     not sure.
    I suspect that it is a carpenter's tool for assuring that the     two sides of a roof have the same angle.
852)    It feeds paper tape. It appears to have a gear and pinch     roller drive to select the speed.
    The head does not look beefy enough to contain a multi-level     punch as would be common with Teletype punches.
    The square shaft is too close to the base and other things to be     used to drive a take-up reel, so I will say that it is probably     for winding up a clockwork drive.
    I suspect that it is for recording Morse Code on the paper tape,     for retaining a permanent record to be checked against the     operator's hand-written copy.
    The larger and whiter metal cover probably protects an ink     roller. It transfers ink to the shaft just below it, and the     spring arm below that is operated by the coil on the right-hand     end of the box, bringing the arm into contact with the paper     tape, and lifting it into contact with the inked shaft to make     markings on the tape. The terminals in the right end near side     connect to the coil -- and would be connected to a relay on the     telegraph line. I think that it predates radiotelegraph.
    Somewhere there should have been a crank or a key for winding it     up -- probably done about the time that the tape was changed.
    Now to see what others have guessed this round.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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848. Handie battery pack sans case.
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R.H. wrote:

849. I think this is a frying pan whose lid looks like a target .
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Thanks, I got a couple of emails stating it was a Stanley No. 30, any idea what the difference is between a No. 30 and No. 30D? I didn't find much on the 30D but found some No. 30's that look just like the one in my photo.
Here's the link on put on the answer page:
http://jonzimmersantiquetools.com/features/no_30.html
Rob
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From Walter's "Antique and Collectible Stanley Tools":
30 Angle Divider Features: Graduated slide bar, pivoting wing arms for finding and marking angles. Manufactured: 1905 to 1969 Patent: Justus Traut's 10/27/1903 (design) Dimensions: 7-3/8 inches long Construction: Cast iron frame, nickeled steel blades Uses: Dividing or bisecting any angle Avg. Price: $50 to $125 (as of 1996) Notes: The blade and screw at the bottom of the frame are often missing.
scott
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missing.
Thanks for the info, I fixed my dimension on the original post.
Rob
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