What is it? CXCIII

Set 193 has just been posted:
http://puzzlephotos.blogspot.com /
Rob
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some more silly guesses from germany ...
1061 to remove the isolation from electric wires, a cable stripper 1062 no idea 1063 oh yes, this is clearly for ... eh, no idea. Itchy and scratchy stuff? 1064 no idea (percussion cap for #1066 or #1060 ?) 1065 no idea 1066 some kind of alarm mechanism. when you touch the long arm (first photo, left side), the triangle in the middle is ejected, releases the hammer which hits a percussion cap stored on the ... how is it named in english? ... on the "amboss" seen on pic 2 in the middle.
greetings from germany chris
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wrote:

1061 looks for all the world like a scotch mechanism out of a shaper.
1062 is a little ornamental lock. mine was made in india and uses a cast brass "I" section key that is poked into the hole not shown in the other end. this action squeezes together two vanes which eventually disengage to allow the lock to be slid apart.
1063 is a stamping/crushing mill. the grate it stamps into isnt something I've ever seen so it isnt for crushing rock. my guess is a continuous coal stamper that feeds a small boiler.
1065 is the very original ping pong bat. these were made illegal in the game of ping pong when it was found that the balls were returning supersonic. :-)
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R.H. wrote:

1064: these remind me of the thimbles which are used to store the elastic rings used in pigeon racing (before the advent of electronic rings). (see also
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/89/Duivenringpotjes.JPG/150px-Duivenringpotjes.JPG )
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wrote:

1061) Wire strippers for wire wrap wire
1064) Percussion caps for firearms
Mark
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1062. Chinese lock. 1065. Sap for whacking people on the head and knocking them out. Karl

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R.H. wrote:

1063    4 stamp mill for braking down rock/ore etc.
No clue on the others.
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wrote:

1061: Hell if I know. 1062: That's brass formed into some "damned if I know what" shape. 1063: Crushes coal to size for a boiler furnace? Possible use on a steam ship. 1064: Percussion caps for item 1066. SEE-1066 below. 1065: Ophthalmologist uses it to cover one of your eyes during eye test chart reading to determine eyesight strength in each separate eye. 1066: Dr Jack Kervorkian's latest "do it yourself" suicide gadget? Dave What do I win?
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1062 is a Korean style "treasure box" lock. Usually they take the form of exotic bas-relief carved cedar or mahogony, and often come in nested sets of three or four boxes.
That sort of lock is also quite often found on high-end Ivory chess sets and Gomoku sets from the orient, circa 1940-1960.
The I-beam key has no "teeth" like would a western style key. It's one- off, hand-made geometry is just a little different for each lock, so that other locks' keys won't fit in the "I" shaped hole. The key merely expands a fork-shaped detent inside or presses up a single-leaf spring latch, to allow one entire end of the lock (with the crosspin/hasp) to slide out. It isn't captive, and can be easily damaged when dropped (don't ask how I know).
LLoyd
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You have the choice ...
... a 5 meter cable for your wireless lan.
or
... free entrance for the next open door day
;-) chris
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- ... a 5 meter cable for your wireless lan.
COAX or Cat - 5?
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

Newsbeitrag
WIRE-less
--
Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
prove it.
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Whooshhhhhh
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wrote:

I'll take the free entrance at the next open door day because I already have the free wireless LAN cables............I shop lifted them at Best Buy. Free.......FREE FOR ME!!! Bwahahahahha!!!! Dave
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#1062 a sliding weight for a beam type scale

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R.H. wrote:

1061 small wire stripper 1062 lock 1063 Cat Crusher 1064 CCI 11M percussion caps (looks like before they added the primer) 1065 Something my wife would like to use on me 1066 is a lot like a fancier 1060
--
Russ

"Praise Jebus!" - H. J. Simpson
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I received an email from somebody looking for help in identifying some things that were found with a metal detector on a football field. They've got some good guesses but they haven't been able to verify exactly what they were for, the original post can be seen here:
http://forum.treasurenet.com/index.php/topic,91892.0.html
Or skip ahead to page four to see all of the photos:
http://forum.treasurenet.com/index.php/topic,91892.300.html
Maybe someone here will recognize them.
Rob
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    Posting from rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
1061)    Hmm ... do the red parts pivot out, to form handles     for levering something into place?
    Otherwise, it looks a little like a variant on a bicycle pedal,     except that it does not have the full-length bearing housing,     and the shape of the red parts is perhaps closer to working as a     hand grip instead of a foot pedal. Perhaps for some kind of     exercise machine?
1062)    Mounting for the end of a strap or handle -- perhaps for     a suitcase?
1063)    My first thought was that it was for crushing sugar cane to     extract the sugar. But it looks as though there is a firebox     below the grate where the crushing goes on -- so perhaps it is     for breaking up coal to a finer size?
    In any case, it is powered by a flat belt through the pulley at     the bottom left, and I would not like to get my limbs in the     path of those crushing blades.
1064)    Primers (caps) for a cap-and-ball weapon. I think that this     size is for cap-and-ball revolvers. The caps slide on over the     nipples on the cylinder, the powder is poured in, and the ball     with wadding and waterproofing is inserted on top of the powder     with a lever operated plunger built under the barrel of the     weapon. (Actually -- don't put the primers in place until all     of the other steps have been completed. :-)
    When the hammer strikes the cap, crushing it between the nipple     and the hammer, it sets off the compound which you can see as a     redish-orange layer in the bottom of some of the caps in the     photo. The fire from that goes though a hole in the nipple, to     set off the powder and launch the ball and wadding through the     barrel.
    I also recognize the mark of one of the common primer makers for     reloading cartridges -- CCI, which is one thing which made me     more sure that I had properly identified these, as they do not     look like the earlier caps which I have seen.
1065)    An early prototype "cosh" (blackjack)? :-)
    Perhaps something used in the beating out of gold leaf?
1066)    A cap and ball salute gun perhaps? Set off either by stepping     on the pedal to the right or by pulling on the chain to pull the     triangular piece of steel out from between the hammer and the     lock mechanism to trigger it.
    The other end of the chain has a safety pin to keep the hammer     from moving until it is removed.
    I don't know for sure whether this is just a noisemaker, or is     actually intended to fire a ball. If the latter, I don't like     the length of the foot pedal.
    Hmm ... a closer look at the sear shows that it releases when     the pedal is moved *up*, not down. This might suggest that it     is for trap shooting of burrowing varmints. Place it over the     hole, then the critter comes out, the top of it's head pushes up     the lever, and the gun discharges to dispose of the critter.
    In any case -- it *might* work with the caps shown up above in     this puzzle set.
------------------------------------------------------------
    Now to see what others have said,         DoN.
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1061 is an adjustable-length wirewrap wire stripper. I think 1066 might be the percussion lock for a cannon. jw
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