What is it? CCXIX

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Number 1224 is the only unidentified item this week, maybe someone will know what piece of equipment it was used with.
http://puzzlephotos.blogspot.com /
Rob
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and again some silly guesses from germany
1221 no idea 1222 early music box? 1223 knocks at your door? or maybee used to hold your curtain 1224 similar tools are used to remove your car radio. 1225 maybee used to roughen something, maybee the downside of your shoes (missing word: Schuhsohle) or any other thing made from leather 1226 no idea
greetings, chris
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Christian Stόben wrote:

Same as English
Schuhsohle = Shoe Sole
Gruί
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On Thu, 14 Feb 2008 11:57:31 +0100, Christian Stόben wrote:

Not as silly as my guesses....

Primitive ice tongs? (I doubt it.)

Much too big for that; my first thought was a wine rack or a humidor

What does it screw into? My first guess was a corkscrew, but the screw part of it clearly isn't big enough.

Part of a primitive penis enlargment device. ;-)

I thought it was for bringing up the nap on something, or maybe something like carding wool. But the handle looks too short, and the device too bulky for that.
Putting the lines in corduroy? :-)
--
Ted S.
fedya at bestweb dot net
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oh, *you* are the spammer. gotcha!
;-)
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1226 is used in photo, movie, ot TV lighting. It's a clamp used to hold a boom to a light stand. Here's a poorly illustrated example: http://www.fullcompass.com/product/233868.html
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" snipped-for-privacy@aol.com" wrote:

It's a grip head for a "C" (Century) stand.
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"Pete C." wrote:

For your amusement...
The grip head:
http://www.msegrip.com/mse.php?show=product&catA5&products_ID%058&PHPSESSID e95867a52c01c52e96221823b7ac37
The "C" stand:
http://www.msegrip.com/mse.php?show=product&catA1&products_ID $070
The typical setup of "C" stand with grip head and arm:
http://www.msegrip.com/mse.php?show=product&catA1&products_ID%434
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R.H. wrote:

if the reins were tied around a post.
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Bill Rider wrote:

I think it the hand off of a classic lawn jocky
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Bill B.

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R.H. wrote:

1222 looks like an airing cupboard for rigid items. It might be good for an art class's oil paintings or items a cabinet maker has treated with linseed oil.
The depth is about the length of a pair of pants. At one time, a man's clothes were normally aired but not washed. This was especially true of woolens. One wouldn't iron something that hadn't been cleaned. When I was a boy, we had metal frames to insert into pants legs. You'd clean any spots on the fabric, insert the frames, possibly dampen the fabric, and let them air. Spiffy pants without a trip to the dry cleaner's.
Perhaps other clothing was also once aired on stretch frames. This cabinet looks big enough for a housewife or servant to do so with the clothing for a household.
1224 The hole near one tip suggests that it was a linchpin with a safety pin to keep it from coming out.
The ends are tapered and the top looks like it was made to be pried loose. That makes me think it was to hold two pieces of machinery tightly together. I wonder if it went around an o-ring connection for fluid.
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Bill Rider wrote:

Here's a link that might be a clue to 1224: http://www.antoninstallers.com /
There are 16 millwrights on the staff. Among other things, millwrights connect shafts and pumps.
This company started in 1988, but perhaps Kintnersville had similar enterprises long before. Perhaps some sort of machinery involving a shaft or pump was built to be connected with two pins, and a millwright decided a dual pin could do it better.
So he goes to Tool Sales Company, and the proprietor has a machine shop make some, and millwrights far and wide buy them.
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I was walking through an antique mall looking for tools when I came across this one, it was marked "old law office piece". It took more than a few minutes for me to figure out what it was, I'll give another clue tomorrow if no one gets it tonight. Each row of the wooden rods is six rods deep, they cannot be removed but they can spin in place; vertically, there are three inches between them.

Yes, I was thinking along these lines, it has some red paint left on it that reminds me of a farm tractor, but I don't know how equipment was attached to them.
Rob
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"R.H." wrote ...

A roosting place for when they turn into bats? Art
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R.H. wrote:

The cases for the Declaration of Independence and each of the first four pages of the Constitution are about about 39 x 34". Was this cabinet for handwritten legal documents? Blueprints are stored like that nowadays.
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Correct, it was for holding large documents but as seen in my photos it's missing all eight drawers. This piece of office furniture is called a flat file, the office where I work had a similar sized one made of metal, it held engineering drawings that were 42" x 30".
Rob
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Ahh, it's where they keep the souls freshly removed from young lawyers, until they dessicate and become harmless.
Still could be a document drying rack.
--
There's no such thing as a free lunch, but certain accounting practices can
result in a fully-depreciated one.
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"Matthew T. Russotto" wrote:

Nonsense! What do you think their law degrees were printed on?
--
Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
prove it.
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The skins of those who didn't make it.
--
There's no such thing as a free lunch, but certain accounting practices can
result in a fully-depreciated one.
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"Matthew T. Russotto" wrote:

Didn't you know that they are cannibals? ;-)
--
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