What Glue For Veneer?

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On Sunday, October 2, 2011 7:38:27 AM UTC-7, Sonny wrote:

I've heard that thin veneers with water-based glues are a problem, because the water expands the veneer, then on drying it can check or curl. One can, however, apply a thin Titebond glue layer, to each of the two surfaces, let it all dry, then iron it down like a hotmelt glue.
I've personally found contact cement very effective and the long working time means you needn't (cannot, really) rush.
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The hot stuff lasts forever dry. Even mixed, unused glue can be stored for a long time in the refrigerator. Mold will ruin it, but I suspect preheating in a microwave kills any spores, same as microwaving a sponge sterilizes it. The jar I mixed up a month ago still hasn't transmogrified into something horrid and foul.
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On Sat, 01 Oct 2011 18:52:59 -0700, Father Haskell wrote:

There was an article long ago in FWW about a Japanese craftsman who used rice glue. He said it not only glued his projects, it served as his lunch! I suppose the same could be said for the gelatin.
I think my wife lost her taste for Jello after I told her it was just hide glue with more refining :-).
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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I'm starting to think that Jello was invented as a drinking bet between two food chemists, to see if glue could be sold as food.
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On 10/1/2011 8:54 AM, Sonny wrote:

One of my favorites for wood veneers and laminating lately:
http://www.woodcraft.com/Family/2005350/2005350.aspx
Has less formaldehyde than most plastic resin glues. All you need is a measuring and some water.
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: I've repaired small veneer chips/missing pieces, using Titebond II, : successfully. I now have a old dresser project with 2 drawers missing : the veneer on their faces.
: What type of glue is appropriate for larger sheets of veneer : application? I don't think typical yellow glue is the appropriate : glue. The drawer faces measure 42"W X 8"H. Base wood is solid maple : and the veneer will be mahogany.
This is a good application for yellow glue, which can be applied, let dry, then will reactivate if you go over it with a clothes iron (forget the right temp range, fairly low).
Or hide glue. There are several inexpensive books on veneering, any one of which will give details on hide glue.
Do NOT use contact cement.
-- Andy Barss
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On Sun, 06 Nov 2011 05:41:37 +0000, Andrew Barss wrote:

Unless you already have a glue pot, use the liquid hide glue. It's not worth using hot hide glue for one project. Take a look at:
http://www.fullchisel.com/blog/?pu1
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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On 11/6/2011 11:39 AM, Larry Blanchard wrote:

Stephens a really good guy, gracious, extremely knowledgeable about hand tools and glues, and willing to patiently explain his choices. He does mostly restoration projects and is a big proponent of hide glues, using the exclusively ... even Franklin's Liquid Hide Glue, in lieu of the real thing.
Lately I've had the pleasure of visiting with him, one on one, in a couple of video "Hangouts" on Google+, very informative.
(He was looking for a guinea pig to test his video camera out, and I was the lucky one in that regard, so I took full advantage of the opportunity) :)
--
www.eWoodShop.com
Last update: 4/15/2010
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Standard model "cheap" glue pot:
http://www.spurlocktools.com/id57.htm
$12.00 knockoff, 1000w, heats glue fast, although the thermostat is hard to fine set. Plug in, wait for the water temp to hit 160 and the glue 145, then unplug. The glue will stay hot enough for the next 15 minutes. Plug in again and repeat as needed.
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On Sun, 06 Nov 2011 13:02:29 -0800, Father Haskell wrote:

Actually, I tend to go with the liquid stuff any time I don't need the extra strength of a high grade hot glue. Which certainly is the case for veneering.
While there are cheap alternatives to a glue pot that work well, including the one you show, there's still the problem of the glue gelling too quickly if the shop and/or the wood is cool.
Yes, one can solve that problem with a little urea, but that starts to resemble the liquid stuff anyway so why bother.
Everybody has there own preferences and the hot hide glue certainly is more traditional.
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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Unibond 800 is made for veneer. It dries rock hard (so no veneer creep at the seams) and is not water based (so the veneer doesn't get all curly on you when you apply the glue to the back of the veneer.
http://www.vacupress.com/veneerglue.htm
It's a two part glue so you will need to measure and mix carefully. It doesn't smell too bad, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't have good air exhaust to keep from breathing it for too long.
Mitch
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On Sun, 06 Nov 2011 17:22:11 -0800, MB wrote:

But it requires pressure. In fact the web site says it's designed for use with a vacuum press. With hide glue, hot or liquid, all you need is a veneer hammer, and some folks make do with a roller.
How about the ability to do curved surfaces without either a press or a form? A cinch with hide glue because of its quick grab.
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