Water soluble aniline dye and hardwood

I recently used Moser's W14904 water soluble aniline dye on a curly (Tiger) maple drop leaf table. After applying the dye I lightly sanded to remove the raised grain. But the stain appears to penetrate the curly maple so little that even a light sanding removes the stain, especially on the corners. I tried applying a second coat of stain but the grain raised again. Any suggestions?
Also, any opinions on Tung Oil as a finish for such a piece?
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Before applying a water based product, wet the surface down with water to raise the grain and then with fine grit sand paper sand the rough spots first. Then apply your water based product.

(Tiger)
the
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(Tiger)
the
I've learnt that it's best to raise the grain first, when working with water/alcohol soluble dye stains. Wet the wood with a slightly damp sponge. Allow to dry and then gently sand. This might take an iteration or two. Then stain. If the grain is still a teensy bit raised, apply a very thing spitcoat of shellac (like 1/2#), allow to dry and then super ultra gently sand it back with 320 grit paper backed by a rubber block. Vacuum or blow the dust off frequently. Go EASY near the corners.
Maple is notorious for being difficult to stain, on account of it pretty much doesn't absorb squat (which is why, I'm assuming, you're using an aniline dye).

It's fine as an undercoat (or even a top coat), though it isn't as durable as a film finish. It really depends on the look/feel you're after. Find the "scared to finish," thread for some solid advice from various people, regarding experimenting with finishes.
O'Deen
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The trick is to dampen, let dry, lightly scuff the fuzz, then apply the dye.
I don't like oil on a whitish wood my self, yellows it too much and makes it look like dog piss in the snow to me but, then again, you may like it so what I or anyone else things of it is pretty immaterial now isn't it.
If you are asking if it provides enough protection, maybe, then again, maybe not. Depends on where the table is going at to what use it is likely to be put to.
--
Mike G.
Heirloom Woods
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(Tiger)
the
Sand more lightly, with a smaller grit? Raise grain before dying? Switch to a non-grain-rasing equivalent?
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