Ten handy facts about shellac

1. Apparently, a fall of approximately 16 inches is sufficient to pop the lid off a quart can of shellac.
2. A quart can of shellac will cover approximately 9 square feet of linoleum floor, and will also goober up any electrical cords, mobile base wheels, work bench legs, and clamps it comes into contact with.
3. If the shellac sits a day or two on a linoleum floor, a lot of it will dry, but the rest will remain liquid so one can soak it up with paper towels.
4. It takes approximately 1/2 gallon of denatured alcohol and a whole roll of those blue paper towels from Home Depot to soak up a quart of shellac.
5. Once the shellac is soaked up and the floor rubbed down with alcohol, a linoleum floor will still be sticky. As will the soles of expensive cross-training shoes.
6. A quart of shellac on the floor and 1/3 gallon of denatured alcohol will stink up a small shop pretty good.
7. If you happen to spill a quart of shellac on the shop floor, make sure to keep your shop dog out of the shop unitl the mess is cleaned up.
8. Most dogs don't like having their feet soaked in denatured alcohol. Some resist vigorously.
9. SWMBO will deny placing said can of shellac in metastable position, and will try to blame HWWW (he who works wood).
10. It takes a long time to get a quart of shellac off a linoleum floor, and it's not a particularly fun activity.
DAMHIKT -Zz
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11. When accidently dropped, shellac (or any other non-water cleanup finish) will cover aproximatly 10 times the surface area it would if properly applied.
12. Dropped or spilled shellac will always land on the most expensive, sensitive, or difficult to clean object.
13. Even if every object is removed and cleaned, and the floor thoroughly scrubbed nd cleaned, dried shellac will later be found.
13a. It will be found in the most visible, obvious spot possible.
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*SNIP* of #1 thru #10

My gawd.... I laughed until I had tears in my eyes. I think of all the paint/finish?solvents I spilled over the years, and I could really feel your pain.
Every last bit of it. What a great description of the ordeal.
Buuuut..... wait until you do that with poly!
Great post!
Robert
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Last night, Time Warner came over to install tv phone, and internet. Of course, the perfect place for the connections is in the back of a cabinet on my worktable (which was a mess anyways) A quart of Rocklers wondercote hit the floor, and the *&%^$^% plastic bottle cracked open and spilled all over. I feel your pain.
Hey, wait a minute! It was your crappy Karma that did this to me!
shelly
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[...snip...]

Try cleaning with ammonia.
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Only takes about a shot glass full of birdshot to turn an expoxy coated - with non slip sand added - floor into the closest thing to ice you can get without freezing the shop. And the little bastards are hard as hell to find - especially if there's a respectable layer of chips and sawdust on the floor (a woowdworking shop should have evidence on the floor that wood has been cut and planed and scraped and/or sanded - or do like I do - buy a bag of sawdust every three or four months and carefully spread it about. The reason for having to replenish the floor covering every few months is because it migrates into the house and car - as if by magic).
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