Tablesaw blade/trunnion adjustment question

I have a Grizzly G0444Z TS. The back of my blade when I rip a board is almost a quarter of an inch closer to the fence than the front of my blade and causes gunk to build up on the right side of the saw blade, and causes the board to bind up and I have to force it through. .I used ovenoff to clean the blade. My sawblade is not bent. According to my saw manual it says to loosen the trunnion bolts and move the assembly to the right or left and retighten the bolts. I did this I cannot get the blade dead-on. The assembly will not move any farther. It is off by a 1/16th of an inch. Is this an acceptable tolerance or do any of you have any suggestions as to how I can get it perfect? Thank you all for your suggestions.
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To get it dead-on perfect get one of these: (TS-Aligner Jr.) You can't go wrong with having one in the shop. http://www.ts-aligner.com/tsalignerjr.htm
Watch the instruction video for table saw on his website.
Read my review here: http://www.garagewoodworks.com/TS_aligner.htm
--
Stoutman
www.garagewoodworks.com
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Tom, something is wrong here. 1/16th is too much no matter how or where you measure it. (What is the 1/4 inch you referred to at the start of your post?)
You can find detailed instructions and different methods in a good TS book or in back issues of several magazines, here are the basics for a contractor's saw:
First, does your saw use the 2 tie bars that extend from front to rear trunnion? If so, they must be adjusted so they are in the same plane & parallel, i.e. not skewed. you can check if they are coplanar by laying a piece of glass or other flat surface item accross them
Now check if the blade is parallel to the miter slots. If not, loosen the trunnion bolts and shift the ass'y until it is. Tighten the bolts and recheck. The trunnion will often shift as the bolts are tightened and you may have to play with it to get it right.
Next, set the fence parallel to the miter slots, some people set it parallel to the blade, but if you do the trunnion adj first it is effectively the same thing.
Last and often overlooked, adjust the splitter so that it is directly centered behind the blade and parallel to it, i.e. it will be in the same plane. I think I remembered it all, if everything is done correctly then all the important items will be correctlyi parallel or perpendicular as appropriate.
One last thing I hope you don't have to deal with is what happens when the blade is tilted. Let's leave that for another post. OK?
--
Often wrong, never in doubt.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore, Maryland - snipped-for-privacy@charm.net
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On Sat, 09 Dec 2006 23:42:56 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net () wrote:

All good information. Is that a Contractor model. If so, in addition replace the flat washers on the trunion machine screws or the washer face screws themselves if that is what you have. On Contractor saws the trunion clearance holes are usually large and the washers and screw faces have "memory" that is they become conical. When you adjust and then tighten, they go right back where they were.
Frank
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Excuse me if this is a repost of my request. I tried to post it previously and it did not show up in my sent folder, so I posted it again.
I have a Grizzly G0444Z TS. The back of my blade when I rip a board is almost a quarter of an inch closer to the fence than the front of my blade and causes gunk to build up on the right side of the saw blade, and causes the board to bind up and I have to force it through. .I used ovenoff to clean the blade. My sawblade is not bent. According to my saw manual it says to loosen the trunnion bolts and move the assembly to the right or left and retighten the bolts. I did this I cannot get the blade dead-on. The assembly will not move any farther. It is off by a 1/16th of an inch. Is this an acceptable tolerance or do any of you have any suggestions as to how I can get it perfect? Thank you all for your suggestions.
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Excuse me if this is a repost of my request. I tried to post it previously and it did not show up in my sent folder, so I posted it again.
I have a Grizzly G0444Z TS. The back of my blade when I rip a board is almost a quarter of an inch closer to the fence than the front of my blade and causes gunk to build up on the right side of the saw blade, and causes the board to bind up and I have to force it through. .I used ovenoff to clean the blade. My sawblade is not bent. According to my saw manual it says to loosen the trunnion bolts and move the assembly to the right or left and retighten the bolts. I did this I cannot get the blade dead-on. The assembly will not move any farther. It is off by a 1/16th of an inch. Is this an acceptable tolerance or do any of you have any suggestions as to how I can get it perfect? Thank you all for your suggestions.
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No, it is not. ANY amount of toe-in (fence closer to blade at back than at front) is dangerous and unacceptable. When wood binds between the blade and fence, there is a severe risk of kickback (wood being thrown back at the operator). The launch velocity is approx. 110 mph for a typical 10" table saw -- in other words, your chance of dodging it is exactly zero.
An even worse danger in kickback is this: where will your hands go when the piece of wood they've been pushing against suddenly disappears? Especially if you've been forcing the wood through as hard as you describe, there is a serious risk that you will lose your balance and stick a hand into the spinning blade. I'm sure it's not necessary to describe how bad that can be.
Slight toe-OUT is acceptable, but never toe-IN. You need to fix this NOW. Seriously. Don't use the saw again until it's aligned properly.

The first step is to align the saw blade dead parallel to the miter slots on the table. Then align the fence to either the slots or the blade. I'm not familiar with your particular saw, but I'd imagine that your owner's manual gives instructions on how to do this.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Did you check to see if the FENCE is Parallel to the table edge?
Blade should be oriented to TABLE, not fence, FENCE oriented to TABLE, not BLADE. If this does not produce Parallel BLADE to FENCE, you may have serious issue(s)
A company makes Trunion Adjusters - can't recall name, but someone will know here. They are supposed to make the trunion adjustment(s) much simpler.
Excuse me if you had squared fence first.

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--
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Hi Tom,
This degree of misalignment is life threateningly dangerous! Do not use the saw until you get it corrected. Proper alignment is anything less than 0.005" error. 1/16" (0.062") is more than an order of magnitude out.
I read through the replies and saw some mention of this but I want to make sure that it is extremely clear. Do not align the blade to the fence (or the fence to the blade). The blade should be aligned so that it is parallel to the miter slot. The fence should also be aligned so that it is parallel to the miter slot. Aligning them directly to eachother is a very bad practice which leads to problems and possibly dangerous misalignment.
I would venture a guess that right now both of them are out of alignment with the miter slot. In fact, I bet it's your fence that is way out and there just isn't enough adjustment in the trunnions to compensate. If you get them both aligned to the miter slot then they will be properly aligned to eachother. If you can't get them aligned to the miter slot, then the saw is defective.
I've got a web page with some video showing how this is done using a dial indicator jig:
http://www.ts-aligner.com/tablesaw.htm
You don't have to buy a TS-Aligner to do this. You can make your own inexpensive jig (follow the link to the "dial indicator on a stick"). Using a dial indicator isn't necessary. There are various other techniques that can be used successfully if you possess the necessary skill and patience (I don't). Using a dial indicator is the fastest, easiest, and most accurate method that I know of. It will get you back to your woodworking as quickly as possible.
Let me know if you have any questions or need any help.
Thanks, Ed Bennett snipped-for-privacy@ts-aligner.com http://www.ts-aligner.com
Tom wrote:

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I would like to clarify that it is perfectly acceptable to align the fence to the blade "AFTER the blade is first aligned to the miter slot".
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Hi Leon,
I would still disagree ;-). See my comments in the other version of this thread.
Ed
Leon wrote:

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I understand. ;~)
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Most of people who've responded to this message suggest loosing up three of the trunnion bolts and shifting the trunnion until the blade is parallell to the miter slot. This is the correct thing to do. However, a problem that I encountered with aligning my own table saw is that I ran out of adjustment space prior to the blade being aligned. The underlying problem was that the front bolts to the trunnion were at one extreme limit and the adjustability on the rear bolts weren't able to be adjusted enough to get things parallell. When that happened, I loosened both front bolts and then shifted the front of the trunnion. This then allowed me to finish making the adjustments on the rear bolts and I finally ended up with the blade parallell to the miter slot. You might be having the same problem with making your adjustments. Attempt to shift the front of the trunnion by using a rear trunnion bolt as a pivot. It just may help.
John Cochran
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