table saw woes


Hi all,
Yesterday afternoon I was running a board through my direct drive table saw, an older 10" Delta model. Half way through the board (I was probably trying to run it through a *little* too fast), the blade stopped and the reset switch popped. Stupid me reset it, tried again (everything powered up normally) and after a bit more cutting it happened again. Now every time I start the saw the blade begins spinning, but it doesn't sound (or look) like it's running at full power. She feels like she's revving up to get up to speed, but once it nears that point the reset switch always pops. I've tried leaving it for 15 minutes, an hour, etc, before trying it again, always with the same result.
I opened up the power box connected to the switch and reset button and gave it a good clean out - very dirty. I also tool the air compressor to the motor and gave it a good blow out (didn't disassemble it, though). I've tried connecting it directly to the outlet (to eliminate the extension cord), no luck (I am on 220 service).
I'm a little lost and wondering if there's something I might be missing in trying to get this sorted. Is it possibly a capacitor problem? The saw is old, but was running perfectly well until I took it to stupid village yesterday. I personally don't think it's the motor, but then what the hell do I know. The inside of the electrical connection box gave off what I considered to be a slightly funny smell when the second reset happened, so that leads me to believe it may be the source of the problem. The connections in there are pretty grubby, but I haven't tested it all yet (any advice for the electronically impaired here so that I can do it right?).
Please, Obi-wans of woodworking, you're my only hope.
Any advice or insight appreciated, including those laced with sarcasm and a general disdain for a classic dumbass-kills-saw types.
Thanks, Dan
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Dan wrote:

< snip >

Hey, breaking a tool happens to everyone. The place you are screwing up is trying to fix it. This is a perfect opportunity to buy a new tool.
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RayV wrote:

Thats just silly. If a good tool can be repaired for a reasonable cost, why waste money and throw out what could be a perfectly good tool
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But it is NOT a perfectly good tool. It is a direct drive undersized, under powered saw and now it is broken. I agree with Ray V. Time to upgrade.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Eggzactly! The OP has proven two things: 1) he uses the tool and 2) his needs are not met by the tool which he had.
Assuming he's going to continue to use that type of tool, why would he repair a mediocre P.O.S. that crapped out on him. Unless he was trying to cut iron pipe with the saw, it's time he got a REAL saw.<g>
Not sure how this is phrased but I believe the above to be a corollary to the "one project, one new tool" line I've been feeding my better half for all these years.
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<snip>
I'm no electrician and don't play one on TV but given your situation I'd give an electric motor repair shop a call. I know it will be a huge pain if you need to remove the motor but it's sounding like you toasted something inside during the overload(s). I hope that you get a more knowledgeable response than mine!!
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sounds like your power suppy, i'd check to make sure your getting 110 on each leg of power to make your 220. will ot run well on one leg. ross
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Direct Drive? 220V? What exactly is the model number for this table saw?
Frank
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Test the run/start capacitor. Dave
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The saw must be very old because all current direct drive saws run on 110 only. However, possible reasons are:
Weakened overload breaker on the saw. Every time one of these things trip, they get a little weaker.
Weakend circuit breaker in the house for the same reason.
Bad switch (burned contacts, etc.)
Since current direct drive saws use what is called a universal motor, these items could be suspect. Note that it would be quite easy to spend more on fixing the old one than a new one would cost.
Bad field winding Bad armature Perhaps brushes although I consider this unlikely. Besides, brushes are a user replaceable item.
Your best bet is to take the motor to a repair place.
Jim
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The brushes could be worn down it it's had a lot of use, or the commutator could be badly pitted from eating sawdust. You can look at and probably remove the brushes. They should be farily smooth on the ends that touch the commutator (shiny copper bit) and the commutator should be somewhat coppery looking, although some darkening is common. The brushes should seat on the commutator and be free to move in their holders. Wilson

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