Stencil Advice?


Hey Guys:
Im finishing up a gift for my young niece: a (bathroom) stepstool. I wanted to decorate it with some stenciled on images. I was wondering if any one has any advice about materials and methods.
So far : 1. I have constructed it out of maple. 2. Dyed it with brightly colored aniline dyes (green and blue). 3. Then applied 3 thin coats of General Finishes Satin Gel Topcoat (polyurethane).
I wanted to use stencils to paint on some starfish, seaweed and seashells using the following:
(1. I have already designed the stencil on the computer.) 2. Print the stencil images to adhesive backed stencil material. 3. Use spray paint (not brush) to apply the images. 4. Over coat the entire stool with more poly or spraycan satin lacquer.
Questions:
1. Source for the computer printable adhesive backed stencil material? What about using printable transparency film and applying some of my own spray adhesive? I'm thinking without the adhesive I'll get bleeding, especially with spray paint?
2. Might the adhesive lift the poly that is there already or leave a residue that will interfere with the subsequent topcoats?
3. What kind of paint? Krylon Satin? I wanted matte or satin. The craft store has brush on acrylic. I really wanted to spray rather than brush. Is the acrylic durable enough?
4. What about satin lacquer from a spraycan as a final topcoat vs just more satin polyurethane? I was thinking Id get better coverage with spray. Is the lacquer as scratch resistant and durable as the poly?
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I've never heard of adhesive-backed stencil material (but don't read too much into my ignorance of the subject) but what's wrong with masking tape?

Sure, but you should be able to remove the residue with an appropriate solvent - that won't attack the paint.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

What about usiny any paper then spraying the back with spray adhesive. It can be applied so the paper will stick adequately but is still easy to remove.

I think you'll probably get bleeding in any case. People often spray stencils by holding them a bit above the surface so that you get overspray that gives an edge that gradually fades into the background. _________

I suppose it depends on the adhesive. ______________

Yes but what's wrong with Krylon? Widely available at most any hardware or home improvement store. ______________

NO!! The lacquer will most likely eat both the poly and the stencil paint. It is also not as scratch resistant.
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On 08/16/2010 08:53 AM, dadiOH wrote:

Most cured polys are resistant to lacquer thinner so the poly probably wouldn't be harmed, but lacquer would almost certainly destroy most of the aforementioned "stencil" paints.
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What you seem to want to do is apply a decoupage to the stool. If I'm not mistaken, decoupage applications are very thin paper, almost like the thin paper wrapping inside a Christmas/holiday gift box.... I forget what it's called, exactly.... tissue type paper, but not toilet tissue-like or paper towel-like. An image is transferred to this paper, before applying onto the piece to be decoupaged.
There are a few reasons for using this kind of thin paper, for decoupage type applications: 1) The paper will not turn a different color or darken, unsightly, when the clear coat is applied, i.e., the wet look, but a differnet wet look, than when testing for the wet look on raw wood. 2) it is supposed to be easy to transfer an image to this type of paper, specifically for decoupage applications. 3) The image will not be altered (darken, color run, etc), when a finish is applied, as it will when using another kind of paper. 4) the paper is thin enough, that no bulk result will appear on a surface. And I think there are a few other reasons for using this thin paper.. I can't recall.
There was someone named Jim, in this rec group, I think, who did decoupage on his handcrafted bellows and other projects. I'll try to find him and follow up on these details. The above paper info came from Jim, when he posted long ago. He also gave info regarding what finish he used and how to apply it. I saved some pics of his work, I think. I'll look for those pics, also.
Sonny
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On 08/16/2010 08:30 AM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

No, it's neither, and poly would be a far better choice for a wet humid environment like a bathroom. Lacquer (the regular nitro-cellulose variety) is also not a good choice for contact with skin; it will turn gummy over time. I also have my doubts about how well it would fare with poly as an undercoat...
If you want a spray-on finish you should be able to find satin poly in a spray can; it's not very common, but I presume it's still be available. I have a can of it around here somewhere; Deft brand I think...
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On Aug 16, 9:30am, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

After applying an adhesive stencil, spray a coat of clear on first. That way the bleed that will go under the stencil will be clear and you won't see it. That clear spray also seals the edge of the stencil. Then apply colour, peel and apply clear over the whole thing. Old sign painters trick.....actually, young ones use that trick too.
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I have used shelving liner material for stencils. the vinyl adhesive backed type. It works well and leaves clean lines. Before starting you can put a light coat of clear on first to seal the edges.
Lightly spray on the first colored coat. The go heavier.
On 8/16/2010 9:30 AM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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On Aug 16, 8:30am, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Go to the hobby or art supply store and ask for frisket. You should be able to get adhesive-backed frisket. Personally, I would print the paterns out on heavy paper (heavier than 20# if you can find it), and stick it down with rubber cement. Even when dry, the rubber cement will peel right off. The frisket is a thin plastic film. You can glue it down with rubber cement too. The frisket is "tougher" and can be peeled up and used repeatedly in different locations. If you're lucky, you can reposition the paper too. Be sure to get the cement to the edge of the stencil cut-out. This will prevent bleed-under. These are all tips I learned while doing art work with an air brush.
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Hey Guys:
Im finishing up a gift for my young niece: a (bathroom) stepstool. I wanted to decorate it with some stenciled on images. I was wondering if any one has any advice about materials and methods.
[snipped]
You might want to find someone who has a vinyl cutting machine, the sort of thing which will make stick on graphics for a car. The vinyl can be cut as a stencil or as a sticker any size from your computer file and shouldn't be expensive. Careful of the residue left by the vinyl adhesive if you are finishing over the top.
Tim W
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On Aug 16, 9:30am, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Photosilkscreen is the ultimate method, transfers fine detail well. Most art stores carry prefab screens and Speedball diazo emulsion. Develop with a cheap 500 watt halogen work light. Apply the ink any way you like. You can use a stencil brush as well as a squeegee.
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