Slight OT: Redwood Fencing?

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Please excuse the OT, as fencing isn't exactly woodworking...
It is time to replace my redwood privacy fencing as it has fallen over. Around here (Nor Cal), they now use pressure treated (brown tone) DougFir for the posts, which is fine with me as it is slightly cheaper than ConHeart. But I am not at all happy about embedding wood directly in concrete. I keep thinking of concrete as basically a sponge that retains any moisture... and I prefer not to rebuild the dang fence again in this lifetime.
Is this really a problem and have others found a remedy for it? I was thinking of dipping the posts in something, perhaps fiberglass resin or even hot tar before placement. Any ideas would be appreciated.
Cheers, Shawn
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"Rima Neas" wrote:

Depends on your budget.
The best, thus highest initial cost, would be to use Sonotubes, anchor bolts, end post brackets and bolts.
Use the tubes as a concrete form and pour the concrete about 12" above grade and the anchor bolts in place using the template provided.
Secure post bracket with anchor boots and bolt post to brackets.
All hardware should be galvanized.
Most expensive, but also most termite proof.
Have fun
Lew
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On Wed, 10 Jun 2009 22:57:47 GMT, "Lew Hodgett"

I'm with Lew on this and you wouldn't have to sink your sonotubes all the way into the hole. You can just stick them down enough to be able to have them give you a form for the above grade part. You'd still do a monolithic pour and, if you dig your holes cleanly and your ground is good, you won't have to worry about a crack line at grade.
If the hole is sloppy and you have to batter board the form, I'd put in a few #4 or #5 rebar.
For sure, I would not bury the posts in concrete. The posts will rot. We used to treat them with creosote but , if we stuck them in concrete, they still rotted.
Regards,
Tom Watson http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
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It sounds like you are advising to have the posts above ground setting on piers. Seems that a slight wind would blow the whole thing over. I think for stability you are going to want the posts in the ground at least 20-24 inches.
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"Leon" wrote:

Yep.
That becomes a function of the bracket which is designed to handle lateral loading from wind, snow, etc.

The Sonotubes should extend below the frost line which in most cases is probably around 24" minimum.
Lew
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So these brackets would probably extend up the post a liberal amount? And the pivot point would be between the post bracket and the pier ? Got a suggestion on where to get those brackets? I'd love to see them, I have built lots'a fences and probably will continue to do so and this bould come in handy at times.
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"Leon" wrote:

Absolutely, probably at least 8"-10" and be thru bolted to the post with a couple of 3/8"-1/2" hex hd bolts and Esna Stop nuts (Aircraft type)

Haven't looked very hard, but if I was still back in Cleveland, I'd head for my buddy's machine shop with a sketch and a 12 pack in hand.
Maybe you got a guy like that in your area, especially with all the oil field shops in the area.
All you need is a machine shop with a shear and a press brake that could handle say 10Ga material and hopefully a punch press for the 9/16" clearance thru holes.
Shear some blanks say 3"x15", punch some 9/16" clearance holes then press brake to form a 90 degree angle ith 3"x12" legs.
Make say 100 pieces then head for the galvanizing shop and be patient.
With such a small load, you want to ride somebody elses coat tails and share the cost, thus avoiding minimum charges.
Have fun.
Lew
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These are used to hold DECKS from falling down. They are strong. Wind blows on decks and lots of moving weight surging across the top as 20 to 30 people move. My back deck was larger than this house.
I miss the house and neighborhood. But not the problems.
Martin
Leon wrote:

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BUT decks have an upper structure to help prevent sway and typically do not have a large fence area to catch the wind.
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On Wed, 10 Jun 2009 19:40:09 -0500, "Leon"

I couldn't find these on Google, so I sketched one up.
Dimensions are estimated from memory.
http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1/onlinestorage/fencepostanchor/Fence%20Post%20Anchor.pdf
Regards,
Tom Watson http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
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wrote:

http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1/onlinestorage/fencepostanchor/Fence%20Post%20Anchor.pdf
lot of folks who build fences would like something like this. I am certainly not going to manufacture this item, but somebody could. It seems to have a built in market. Just a thought.
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On Thu, 11 Jun 2009 14:15:12 -0400, "Lee Michaels"

I'll put a call into Billy Mays Here.
Regards,
Tom Watson http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
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"Lee Michaels" wrote:

Read my post to Leon.
Basically samo samo.
Lew
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wrote:

http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1/onlinestorage/fencepostanchor/Fence%20Post%20Anchor.pdf
THANK YOU Tom! I see now. Still I think I would be more comfortable with a 24" strap than the illustrated 12". However I do have the ever present possibility of a hurricane every year. Fortunately none of mine that I have built in the last 5 years blew down after the storm last September, many did not do so well.
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On Thu, 11 Jun 2009 22:41:07 -0500, "Leon"

Here are several designs of commercially available post anchors from Simpson: http://www.strongtie.com/products/categories/post_bases.html
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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"Tom Veatch" wrote:

Personally, if that is their total offering, I don't see anything that would come close to being suitable for a free standing post application.
Lew
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Agreed! 8 or 9 inches is not going to cut it unless the fence is inside a building where no one or wind will come in contact with it.
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The Simpson post / column bases are not designed nor meant for free standing (ie fence post) applications......read the catalog notes.
cheers Bob
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Yes - I use the LCB44/LCB46 for my fences (6' and 7' redwood with 2x12 PT kicker and 4x4 or 4x6 PT posts using 1/2" bolts).
scott
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Lew-
Your concept is good but the devil is in the details.
NONE of the Simpson post bases / column bases are designed / meant to be used in free standing post configuration (ie a fence post or flag pole) Read the catalog notes.
A 4x4 post embedded in concrete in the ground has a decent "moment capacity". To get a fence post connected to a "concrete chunk" via a metal connector to perform the same as an embedded post requires a bit of design; especially the fastener size and pattern.
Its not as simple as it appears ....... a moment capable connection; wood to concrete via metal connector winds up being a pretty hefty piece of hardware
cheers Bob
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